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Company offers services to support new shelter

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By Amber Coulter

A Radcliff company isn’t afraid to get a little dirty to help area animals.

ReALife LLC, home of PetCorps Dog Waste Removal Service, has announced plans for the company to offer 30 free yard cleanings during May.

The company has offered dog waste removal in Hardin County for six years, with employees collecting the waste with rakes and industrial dust pans and disposing of it off site.

Cleanings are free, and donations are accepted for PAWS Shelter Foundation.

A building for the new shelter on Peterson Drive has been paid off, but donations continue to be accepted for construction.

Amenities are expected to include dog acquaintance rooms where prospective owners can spend time with animals they’re considering adopting, a communal room in which social cats can live together until adoption, outdoor play yards with Astroturf and a Powerloo to flush waste. There also are plans to have separate air controls for adoptive, stray and sick dog kennels to prevent the spread of disease.

Those improvements over the antiquated shelter on Nicholas Street, built in 1959, are needed to provide adequate health conditions and care for animals and better working conditions for caretakers, PAWS Foundation President Deedie Layman said.

ReALife LLC owner Jason Smith said the company has helped Hardin County Animal Control in the past and met PAWS members through those efforts.

He thought offering waste removal services for donations would be a good way to support the effort.

“Any way that we can help PAWS, we’re going to pitch in and do it,” he said.

Research and time spent as a former veterinary technician in the U.S. Army at Fort Knox have shown Smith some animals are euthanized because they can’t find a home.

He hopes the new shelter will boost adoption rates.

“I hope that pets will be readily adopted, instead of put to death,” he said.

Anyone interested in a free yard cleaning can register online at www.ky

pooperscooper.com by Tuesday.

The average dog produces about 5.25 pounds of waste each week, creating a major source for bacteria, containing parasites such as roundworm and hookworm and causing excess nutrients in local water, according to the company.

Amber Coulter can be reached at (270) 505-1746 or acoulter@thenewsenterprise.com.