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Dash of Class: Shared recipes from a Vermont wedding

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Food column by Nora Sweat

By Nora Sweat

Many of my loyal readers will remember that I have a niece who married in Hawaii a year ago Christmas and had a reception in Louisville last spring, and I had the honor, I think, of making their wedding cake. On Aug. 7, another niece married in Burlington, Vt. It was a weekend to remember and I brought home some recipes to share with you.

The rehearsal dinner, hosted by the groom’s parents, John and Sandy Everitt, was held in Kelly and Noah’s home and was a barbecue that rivaled any in Kentucky. John, Sandy, and their son, Noah, and his bride-to-be and my niece, Kelly, had made sliced pork barbecue, pulled pork and chicken barbecue, green salad with baked beets (gold, not the traditional red), rice with tomatoes and other seasonings. Blueberry pie was made by Kelly.

This rehearsal dinner was not just for the bridal party, but for the entire out-of-town group, 90 in total. Other than family guests were college friends from Miami of Ohio University, where Kelly and Noah first met. The tables were outside with lovely rust-colored tablecloths for the round tables. Kelly and Noah’s beautiful flower gardens were the source of the centerpieces for the tables. Along with being very good cooks, Noah and Kelly have lovely flower gardens and a fruit and vegetable garden in their side yard. It was obvious to me that hospitality isn’t a southern thing alone. The rehearsal dinner was so graciously served by our hosts.

The wedding was Quaker in style, the chairs were in circles of varying size and the the bride and groom sat facing each other. In Quaker-style weddings, the ceremony starts with solemn quiet. Then as the spirit filled the guests, they spoke of the bride or groom or both. It was to take an hour in length, and surprisingly enough there was no one left to stand around the 50-minute mark. The couple then repeated their own written vows and exchanged rings.

The reception began as the guests greeted the newly married couple while hors d’ oeuvres were served to the guests. It was fun as the guests found their tables. Mike and I were seated at the “Baby Boomers” table and our nephew, Chris, and his wife, Cheryl, were seated at the Millennium table. ”New England” was another table. All the guests were served a delicious dinner with wedding cake with both red raspberry filling and a lemon filling in between the three-layer white cake. The party went on into the night as dancing and more dancing took place. However, the Baby Boomers turned in a little earlier, feeling the fatigue of the day.

The next morning, after attending Mass and checking out of the hotel, we traveled to Winooski, one mile from Burlington, to Kelly and Noah’s home, where they and Noah’s parents hosted a brunch for about 60 out-of-town guests. The tables now had light green tablecloths with the floral centerpieces from Friday night. Noah’s mother, Sandy, made wonderful frittatas and the recipe follows. Kelly had made delicious Zucchini Cranberry Walnut muffins and I also have that recipe to share. There was fresh fruit and sourdough bread for sandwich making with prosciutto, ham and a variety of cheeses. Orange juice and even Mimosas were the beverages of choice along with flavored coffees.

As travel plans demanded, people left the wonderful brunch. Tears were shed as college friends and family had to leave as they promised to return someday. As our flight was not until 7:24 p.m., we were lucky to have time to visit with immediate family.

The weekend was such a blur, as things happened so quickly. One thing I did learn was that hospitality is not displayed by the south alone. Vermont demonstrated equal hospitality. It was also a treat as a French Canadian to see my maiden name, Vaillancourt, in the Burlington phone book 17 times, as Montreal is only an hour and a half away from Burlington.

Our next trip to Vermont will definitely include a trip to Montreal, where more Vaillancourts probably reside.
 

Nora Sweat is a native of Hardin County and a retired home economics/family and consumer science teacher. She can be reached at norasweat@thenews enterprise.comor by mail at 408 W. Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown, KY 42701.

Kelly’s Blueberry Pie

Pastry for a two-crust pie

5 c. blueberries

1 c. sugar

½ t. cinnamon

4-5 t. cornstarch

¼-1/2 t. salt

2-3 T. butter

The juice of ½-1 lemon

1 egg

½ c. water

Mix all dry ingredients together, sprinkle over blueberries, and mix well, but gently. Pour all into a pastry-lined pie plate. Cut butter into small pats and place over the top of blueberry mixture. Squeeze the lemon juice over the entire top. Place top crust on top, fold over bottom crust, tuck under and flute the edges. Cut 2 or 3 air vents with a paring knife. Mix the egg and water and brush the egg wash over the top crust with a pastry brush. Bake for 50 minutes at 425 degrees. If top crust seems to be getting too brown, place a sheet of aluminum foil over top or strips around crust edges.

Source: Kelly O’Malley Everitt, Winooski, Vermont

The wedding was Quaker in style, the chairs were in circles of varying size and the the bride and groom sat facing each other.In Quaker style weddings, the ceremony starts with solemn quiet. Then as the spirit filled the guests, they spoke of the bride or groom or both. It was to take an hour in length, and surprisingly enough there was no one left to stand around the 50-minute mark. The couple then repeated their own written vows and exchanged rings.

The reception began as the guests greeted the newly married couple while hors d’ oeuvres were served to the guests. It was fun as the guests found their tables. Mike and I were seated at the “Baby Boomers” table and our nephew, Chris, and his wife, Cheryl, were seated at the Millennium table. ”New England” was another table. All the guests were served a delicious dinner with wedding cake with both red raspberry filling and a lemon filling in between the three layer white cake. The party went on into the night as dancing and more dancing took place. However, the Baby Boomers turned in a little earlier, feeling the fatigue of the day.

The next morning, after attending Mass and checking out of the hotel, we traveled to Winooski, one mile from Burlington, to Kelly and Noah’s home, where they and Noah’s parents hosted a brunch for about 60 out-of-town guests. The tables now had light green tablecloths with the floral centerpieces from Friday night. Noah’s mother, Sandy, made wonderful frittatas and the recipe follows. Kelly had made delicious Zucchini Cranberry Walnut muffins and I also have that recipe to share. There was fresh fruit and sourdough bread for sandwich making with prosciutto, ham and a variety of cheeses. Orange juice and even Mimosas were the beverages of choice along with flavored coffees.

As travel plans demanded, people left the wonderful brunch. Tears were shed as college friends and family had to leave as they promised to return someday. As our flight was not until 7:24 p.m., we were lucky to have time to visit with immediate family.

The weekend was such a blur, as things happened so quickly. One thing I did learn was that hospitality is not displayed by the southern alone. Vermont demonstrated equal hospitality. It was also a treat as a French Canadian to see my maiden name, Vaillancourt, in the Burlington phone book 17 times, as Montreal is only an hour and a half away from Burlington. Our next trip to Vermont will definitely include a trip to Montreal, where more Vaillancourts probably reside.

Sandy’s Frittata

¾ cup chopped green peppers

1 ½ c. sliced mushrooms

1 ½ cups chopped zucchini

¾ cup chopped onion

1 t. garlic powder (less or more to taste)

3 tablespoons oil

6 eggs, beaten slightly

¼ c. milk

8 oz. diced cream cheese

1 ½ c. shredded cheddar cheese

2 c. cubed dry bread

1 t. salt

¼ t. pepper

1 pound sausage

Sauté vegetables in oil and cool slightly. Beat eggs with milk. Brown sausage, drain, and crumble. Add all ingredients, mix well. Pour into well greased 9” x 13” x 2” pan or a 10” springform pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Bake only until barely set if making ahead of time and then bake 20-30 minutes later.

Source: Sandy Everitt, mother of the groom

 

Kelly’s Zucchini Cranberry Walnut Muffins

3 c. grated fresh zucchini

2/3 c. butter, melted

1 1/3 c. sugar

2 eggs, beaten

2 t. vanilla

2 t. baking soda

Pinch of salt

3 c. all purpose flour

2 t. cinnamon

½ t. (or more) nutmeg

1 c. walnuts

1 c. dried cranberries (or raisins)

Do not use a mixer for this recipe. In a large bowl, combine the sugar, eggs, and vanilla. Stir in the grated zucchini and then the melted butter. Sprinkle the baking soda and salt over the zucchini mixture and mix in. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, nutmeg and cinnamon. Stir the dry ingredients into the zucchini mixture. Stir in walnuts and cranberries that have been coated with some of the dry ingredients to prevent settling to the bottom.

Coat muffin pans with food release spray. Fill muffin cups up with batter until full. Bake in the middle of the oven at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes. Test with a long toothpick or press to see if they are done. Set on wire rack to cool for 5 minutes and then remove the muffins from the pan. Allow to cool 20 more minutes before serving. Kelly used the giant muffin pans for a delicious, larger muffin.

Source: www.simplyrecipes.com, revised by Kelly O’Malley Everitt

 

Nora Sweat is a native of Hardin County and a retired home economics/family and consumer science teacher. She can be reached at norasweat@thenewsenterprise.comor by mail at 408 W. Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown, KY 42701