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Historic donation to help HCS students

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Llewellyn leaves $2.42 million endowment for scholarships

By Amber Coulter

An endowment from a former social worker for Hardin County Schools is planned to support students from the district with the largest philanthropic gift in the county’s history.

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The $2.42 million endowment left to Central Kentucky Community Foundation by the estate of Charley Nell Llewellyn is expected to generate about $100,000 each year to provide scholarships to students of Hardin County Schools based on need.

Another $1 million is planned to eventually be added to the endowment, adding about $40,000-$50,000 in additional money for scholarships every year.

The announcement of the Llewellyn Scholarship Fund was made Friday at Brown-Pusey House in Elizabethtown and marked the first anniversary of her death.

Superintendent Nanette Johnston said scholarships aren’t limited in regard to colleges at which they can be used.

“People can go where they want to go to pursue their dreams, and she’s going to help them to do that,” she said.

Johnston said she wanted to thank Llewellyn for her leadership in the past and the present.

“She has impacted the students of the past,” she said. “She’s impacting us now, and she will forever impact them in Hardin County.”

Foundation President and Chief Operating Executive Al Rider said an endowment is a special gift because it continues to invest in a cause without end and shows   confidence in the success of the institution in which it is invested.

Llewellyn’s confidence in and commitment to the future of education isn’t surprising to anyone who knew her, he said.

Friend and coworker Judy Lay said Llewellyn was dedicated to helping students and families and found creative ways to raise money to assist them.

“She got into their lives,” she said.

Llewellyn also was a crusader for equal rights for women and had a close eye on how girls were treated in schools, from academics to sports, Lay said.

“I don’t know if she was a woman ahead of her time, but I do know that she was at the right time in the right place, and that was in Hardin County,” she said.

Amber Coulter can be reached at (270) 505-1746 or acoulter@thenewsenterprise.com.