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Monday's Man

  • Bo knows, promotes tennis

    To borrow from a popular advertising campaign of the ‘90s, Bo knows tennis.

    Bo O’Brien also knows basketball, baseball, football and track, among other sports.

    The Elizabethtown resident has been involved in sports for most of his life and these days he is chairman of the Elizabethtown Tennis Commission.

    “This is my way of volunteering,” O’Brien, 64, said of his work with the commission.

  • Baseball at the heart of a lot of memories

    I decided nine days ago what my column would be today.

    I decided five days ago as I hauled out the garbage under a lit up night sky of electricity that it would become a doubleheader about baseball and what it can be to dads and men like me.

    Best I can figure, I have coached baseball for 13 years. I even coached when I didn't have a son playing. So I have seen a lot of ball fields, a lot of games, a lot of great wins and even a few, even to this day, head-scratching losses.

  • Bobby Sheroan applies the discipline of martial arts to daily life

    The disciplines of personal responsibility, courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and an indomitable spirit are not only what Grandmaster Bobby Sheroan practices in Tae Kwon Do and other martial arts, but also what he’s practiced in work and family life.

    After graduating with the last graduating class of Vine Grove High School in 1962, Sheroan went to General Motors training school in Cincinnati and worked as the service manager at a local Buick dealership.

  • Art of Performance: Disasters can spawn new successes

    There is one professional baseball organization that stands out as the worst over the last 20 years. That organization is the Pittsburgh Pirates. They have endured 19 losing seasons in a row. They have played bad baseball and made questionable trades for many years. Their losing performance is illustrative of a team going in the wrong direction.

    The Pirates have not always been so bad. They have a history of World Series championships and some of the best baseball players have played for them. But for the last 19 years, they have been the worst team in baseball.

  • HCP artistic director Bo Cecil finds place in the arts

    When telling of a season at Hardin County Playhouse, artistic director Bo Cecil often uses a food analogy, describing the offerings as the various courses of a good meal.

    Such a comparison is fitting for the 40-year-old Hodgenville resident who studied culinary arts at Sullivan University and taught world cuisine classes to high school seniors within a two-hour radius of Louisville. He enjoyed doing so except for one aspect.

    “I hate to drive,” Cecil said.

  • For Your Health: Don't sacrifice summertime safety

    It seems that not too long ago summertime used to be called summer vacation. Now it’s nothing like a vacation but rather the summer work season.

    Between regular jobs, getting kids to sporting events and the endless list of things to do around the house, we wonder how will we ever get everything done. What shortcuts can be taken? How fast will this lawnmower go?

    But one thing we never want to do is to take shortcuts with safety.

  • David Haines rides to recovery

    It’s been a long ride for David Haines. He’s journeyed from young soldier to armor officer to wounded warrior to chief operating officer of Ride 2 Recovery, an organization out to support wounded warriors through cycling.

    Haines joined the U.S. Army at 18, right out of high school, in his home state of Rhode Island. He was a tank crewman and trained at Fort Knox.

  • A Lucas move could ruin classic video game

    By Forrest Berkshire

    Updating a classic can be tricky.

    Take, for example, the “enhanced” Star Wars trilogy. Never has a man gone from revered to reviled as quickly as George Lucas after the release of his remastered trilogy. It was bad enough when he made those last three prequels with Jar Jar Binks. But then he had to go and mess with the original films, adding in some special effects and tinkering with the storyline just enough to completely destroy the central morality tale of the film. I mean, really George, Greedo shooting first?

  • Continuing a family tradition at ECTC

    Nineteen-year-old Andrew Beasley isn’t the first person in his family to attend Elizabethtown Community and Technical College.

    In fact, he isn’t the second, third, fourth or fifth.

    Beasley, who graduated from ECTC this spring with an associate degree in arts, is the ninth of his siblings to attend the college.

    “There’s 11 of us, total,” he said. “There’s nine boys and two girls.”

  • A father, two sons and baseball

    Baseball often is considered America’s pastime. As a part of that tradition, fathers and sons flock to the fields in summer to coach and play.

    Jeff Gregory and his sons, 12-year-old Jey and 8-year-old Ryder, continue that tradition.

    Gregory grew up in Elizabethtown playing with the Elizabethtown Area Baseball Commission, staring with tee ball and playing all the way through to the big field as a teen.

    He also played at Elizabethtown High School for coach Ron Meyers and was part of the 1992 state runner-up team.