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Monday's Man

  • Kerby Grey: Young farmer of the year

    Kerby Grey has been farming in Cecilia most of his life. He recently was recognized as Kentucky Young Farmer Member of the Year.

    He started farming when he graduated high school, but even before that he always worked on a farm. When he was “big enough to work in tobacco,” he was big enough to work on a farm, he said.

    Today, his nephews and brother also work on the farm. His dad helps when he can.

    He’s farming about 2,100 acres this year.

  • Passion flowers for preserve botanist, volunteer

    On any given day at Saunders Springs Nature Preserve in Radcliff, Adrian Bambini might be walking its trails in search of the green dragon.

    Or he might be found wandering in the direction of the compass plant.

    Then again, he might just stop to feed the fish and deer.

  • Bob Potter has retail in his blood

    Growing up on a farm in Tennessee, Bob Potter, 73, never dreamed he’d spend 47 years in retail.

    “It got in my blood and never left,” he said.

    In November 1958, he began working for Kuhn’s Variety based in Nashville.

  • This Digital Life: Consuming by tablet, producing by computer

    With great fanfare Apple released its new iPad last week.

    I want one. You probably want one. It broke some already impressive records for initial sales with more than 3 million sold in the first three days it was available.

    Tablet computers are the latest high-tech, must-have items, and the iPad tops that list.

  • On alert for safety: Doug Finlay proceeds with compassion

    When the tornado sirens blare, not everyone runs for cover.

    It’s a sure bet Doug Finlay, Hardin County deputy emergency management director, will be in the thick of things.

    “The biggest part of my role is planning for disasters,” Finlay said.

    Part of the planning he does involves coordinating communication between various agencies, such as fire departments, search and rescue teams, and the sheriff’s department. Often it means setting up an emergency operations center at the Emergency Management Services building.

  • Fulfilling a destiny: The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim took a leap of faith

    The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim’s journey to the pulpit in America was full of events he describes as “miraculous.”

    Rev. Joe, as his parishioners call him, came to the United States in 2001.

    He was born in a small town on the eastern coast of South Korea.

    “I was a country boy,” Kim said.

    His father was a farmer who grew vegetables. Kim was the youngest in the family with four brothers and two sisters.

  • The Art of Performance: Basketball provides opportunity for community to heal

    Sometimes basketball provides an opportunity for a top performance outside the court.

    Recently a terrible tragedy hit the high school of Chardon, Ohio, which is a small rural school not far from Cleveland. On this day, a former student entered the high school cafeteria and opened fire on a table of high school seniors. Three of the five students who were shot have since died.

  • ‘Lin-sanity’ brings political correctness to light

    Stop it.
    I don’t care how well Jeremy Lin is playing for the New York Knicks.
    Sorry, folks.
    So what if we’re both Asian-Americans?
    Turn on the television. Read websites and magazines. Listen to the talking heads. He’s everywhere.
    He’s the NBA’s version of the NFL’s Tim Tebow, his league’s global savior.
    Stop it.
    Please don’t automatically assume that every Asian-American is rooting for him to become a star and help the Knicks make the playoffs.

  • Family, giving right up Dean Taylor's alley

    For more than 48 years, a sense of family and giving has been the driving force inspiring Dix-E-Town Lanes co-owner Dean Taylor.

    Those values have translated into helping start high school bowling leagues and offering children free games, among other efforts.

    “It was Mom and Dad; they just ingrained in us boys: family,” Taylor said. “We were blessed.”

    Taylor’s parents partnered with three others and purchased the bowling alley in 1962, the year after it opened its doors.

  • This Digital Life: A computer’s built-in browser isn’t always best

    As better options present themselves, the once-dominant king of the Web browsers, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, continues to lose users.

    It once was common for people who bought a new computer to just use the browser that came with their system.

    At its peak in the latter half of 2004, the default browser for Windows, Internet Explorer, claimed more than 92 percent of the market.Today, it accounts for less than half.