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Monday's Man

  • AUSA president strives to give back to community

    Making sure the military is represented in Washington, D.C., is not a task Gene Gudenkauf takes lightly.

    Neither is community spirit.

    Gudenkauf, who has been a member of the Association of the United States Army since the mid-1980s, is the current president of the Fort Knox chapter of AUSA.

    On the board of the Community Leadership Program and a three-time member of the Radcliff Chamber of Commerce, Gudenkauf also finds time to get involved in civic activities.

  • Art of Performance: Focus under pressure leads to performance under pressure

    Occasionally a new head coach arrives on the scene and helps players focus on the right things at the right time.

    James Franklin became the head football coach at Vanderbilt University for the 2011 season. He took over a program that had won a total of four games in the last two seasons. Vanderbilt has never been known as a powerhouse in football even though they play in the Southeastern Conference, arguably the toughest football conference in the United States.

  • Allen Baugh: Doing what hits his warm button

    At age 81, Allen Baugh’s life is a mix of farming, faith, science and craftsmanship.

    He’s farmed all his life. He was born near West Point and his family moved to Jefferson County in the mid 1940s. In 1955, the family moved to farm in Hardin County and he’s lived in Hardin County ever since.

    Farming has always been something he enjoyed.

    “It just hits my warm button,” he said.

  • This Digital Life: A little research goes a long way when purchasing electronics

    By Forrest Berkshire

    Caveat emptor. Let the buyer beware.

    It’s an old term, but it still applies today, especially as the holiday shopping season ramps into full gear.

    Electronics — from TVs to tablet computers to digital cameras — are always hot items for Christmas. And judging by the sale ads in the Thanksgiving edition of The News-Enterprise, this year is no different.

  • Childhood memories are a Google search away

    When it comes to the always-changing world of technology, I figure I’m about two years behind most.
    I never thought I would text, and now I do that more than I talk on the phone.
    I had no use for Facebook when it was unveiled and now I get on my page a few times a day and even occasionally offer a status update.
    Browsing the Web? Until about a year or so ago, I was only on the Internet when I needed to be to check on how the Red Sox were doing that night. Now, it occupies a good chunk of my life.

  • Giving, family and turkey are the pillars of David Gibson's life

    On Thanksgiving, local hunter David Gibson has many things to be thankful for including his family, the ability to give back to his community and turkey.

    Gibson has lived in Glendale all his 49 years. He’s been an avid hunter for a long time and hunts a little bit of everything including turkey, deer, rabbit, squirrel — “the whole nine yards,” he said.

    But turkey is his favorite.

    He is president of the Heartland Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation and is a director on the state NWTF board.

  • Volunteering for veterans

    Veterans should never be forgotten, and if C.T. Christie has anything to say about it, never will be.

    Christie, a Kentucky Patriots volunteer, hopes to raise awareness of the needs of veterans and encourage volunteerism, especially by other veterans.

    “They just got to get more involved helping each other,” Christie said.

    The Rineyville man follows his own advice.

  • Protection as performance in sports

    The Art of Performance by Dr. Keith Wilson

  • 66-year gig with 88 keys for 77-year old Warren Moore

    As a pianist and organist, 77-year-old Warren Moore has been the sound of Sunday service at Vine Grove United Methodist Church for 33 years.

    In fact, Moore has been playing piano and organ for the last 66 years at several churches in and out of Hardin County.

    “I took private piano lessons in my early years,” said Moore, who lives near Fort Knox just inside Meade County.

    Moore was 10, to be exact, when he started taking lessons. A year later, he was playing piano for church. He is self-taught on the organ.

  • For Your Health: Education, lifestyle changes could turn back alarming diabetes trends

    November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Kentucky had the fourth highest percentage of diabetes diagnosed in 2009, according to the Kentucky Diabetes Fact Sheet, which is published yearly by the Center for Disease Control. Kentucky’s rate of diabetes is 11.4 percent compared to the national average of 8.3 percent. Experts estimate that if the current rate of diabetes diagnosis continues, by the year 2050 one in three Americans will be diagnosed with diabetes.