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Monday's Man

  • Fulfilling a destiny: The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim took a leap of faith

    The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim’s journey to the pulpit in America was full of events he describes as “miraculous.”

    Rev. Joe, as his parishioners call him, came to the United States in 2001.

    He was born in a small town on the eastern coast of South Korea.

    “I was a country boy,” Kim said.

    His father was a farmer who grew vegetables. Kim was the youngest in the family with four brothers and two sisters.

  • The Art of Performance: Basketball provides opportunity for community to heal

    Sometimes basketball provides an opportunity for a top performance outside the court.

    Recently a terrible tragedy hit the high school of Chardon, Ohio, which is a small rural school not far from Cleveland. On this day, a former student entered the high school cafeteria and opened fire on a table of high school seniors. Three of the five students who were shot have since died.

  • ‘Lin-sanity’ brings political correctness to light

    Stop it.
    I don’t care how well Jeremy Lin is playing for the New York Knicks.
    Sorry, folks.
    So what if we’re both Asian-Americans?
    Turn on the television. Read websites and magazines. Listen to the talking heads. He’s everywhere.
    He’s the NBA’s version of the NFL’s Tim Tebow, his league’s global savior.
    Stop it.
    Please don’t automatically assume that every Asian-American is rooting for him to become a star and help the Knicks make the playoffs.

  • Family, giving right up Dean Taylor's alley

    For more than 48 years, a sense of family and giving has been the driving force inspiring Dix-E-Town Lanes co-owner Dean Taylor.

    Those values have translated into helping start high school bowling leagues and offering children free games, among other efforts.

    “It was Mom and Dad; they just ingrained in us boys: family,” Taylor said. “We were blessed.”

    Taylor’s parents partnered with three others and purchased the bowling alley in 1962, the year after it opened its doors.

  • This Digital Life: A computer’s built-in browser isn’t always best

    As better options present themselves, the once-dominant king of the Web browsers, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, continues to lose users.

    It once was common for people who bought a new computer to just use the browser that came with their system.

    At its peak in the latter half of 2004, the default browser for Windows, Internet Explorer, claimed more than 92 percent of the market.Today, it accounts for less than half.

  • Steve Sherrard makes the wheels on the Bulldogs’ bus go ’round and ’round

    Steve Sherrard is more than a bus driver to the John Hardin High School boys’ basketball team and coaches.

    “The players and coaches look to Steve as part of our staff,” head varsity coach Mark Wells said.

    They jokingly refer to Sherrard as director of basketball operations.

    “He is more than just our bus driver, though he is very skilled and professional about his driving,” Wells said.

    The players often call him Mr. Sherrard.

  • As a longtime volunteer for North Hardin High School basketball, Rick Skeeters moved ... from court to keeper

    Volunteering to keep the books and stats for North Hardin High School boy’s basketball team is a natural fit for Rick Skeeters.

    Head coach Ron Bevars coached Skeeters when he was a student at NHHS.

    “I played on Ron’s very first team,” Skeeters said.

    “We go back,” Bevars said, explaining Skeeters was on his team in 1971 when Bevars arrived at NHHS.
    Skeeters has been watching NHHS basketball teams since 1968-69, he said.

    By Skeeters’ senior year, Bevars was head coach.

  • Fields of dreams can be everywhere

    I took a drive the other day and the silver Envoy found some neat places in Hardin County.
    They were the fields of play for our children from long ago, it now seems.
    I drove by University Drive and found myself looking at the ball fields and remembering all the time our family spent there over the years playing, coaching, watching and working in a hot concession stand.

  • A most familiar voice: Mike Bell on the mic

    If you’ve been to a basketball or football game at Central Hardin High School, you’ve heard his voice bellowing over the PA system. Mike Bell has been the voice of CHHS since it opened in 1990.

    Prior to that, he announced games at East Hardin when it was a high school. He announced for girls’ basketball going all the way back to the 1970s.

    His office at Glendale Christian Church is lined with plaques featuring previous teams and their photos. There are even more in his office at home.

  • The Art of Performance: Eli Manning delivers a confident, calm performance

    Players wants to be at their best when it matters most. The regular season can be gratifying but to play at the highest level in a championship game is sublime.

    Eli Manning has superb physical gifts as an athlete. He had many advantages growing up since his father was an NFL quarterback. Manning was born to be a NFL quarterback.