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Monday's Man

  • Keeper of White Mills' history

    When people need information about the history of White Mills, they usually go to one source, Henry Morrison.

    Morrison has lived in White Mills most of his life. He spends his post-retirement days delving in court house records and pouring over old newspaper articles in the library at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College.

    Documenting the small, storied town almost is a full-time hobby.

  • This Digital Life: Apple systems no longer virus-free

    The myth of Mac computers’ invulnerability against viruses was crushed this month with the report by the computer security firm Kapersky Labs that 600,000 Macs were infected by a nasty piece of malware going by the name Flashback/Flashfake.

    That announcement was followed quickly by another revealing an exploit of Microsoft Word on Macs.

  • Jamie Henderson: Pink Heals, Tunnel to Towers part of community involvement for Radcliff fire chief

    Radcliff Fire Chief Jamie Henderson has been tested by fire and ice and has met those challenges while seeking ways to serve the community.

    After working as a firefighter for years for the Vine Grove and Radcliff fire departments, Henderson took on the role of fire chief just before the January 2009 ice storm.

    “I learned, myself, about resources,” Henderson said, explaining he had taken on an emergency management role.

  • The Art of Performance: A perfect night in basketball

    First, let me say I am not from Kentucky. However, I have lived in and close to Kentucky for many years and know that basketball is very important to this state. I feel honored that I had the opportunity to observe from close distance one of the most important and fun moments for the commonwealth.

  • Kerby Grey: Young farmer of the year

    Kerby Grey has been farming in Cecilia most of his life. He recently was recognized as Kentucky Young Farmer Member of the Year.

    He started farming when he graduated high school, but even before that he always worked on a farm. When he was “big enough to work in tobacco,” he was big enough to work on a farm, he said.

    Today, his nephews and brother also work on the farm. His dad helps when he can.

    He’s farming about 2,100 acres this year.

  • Passion flowers for preserve botanist, volunteer

    On any given day at Saunders Springs Nature Preserve in Radcliff, Adrian Bambini might be walking its trails in search of the green dragon.

    Or he might be found wandering in the direction of the compass plant.

    Then again, he might just stop to feed the fish and deer.

  • Bob Potter has retail in his blood

    Growing up on a farm in Tennessee, Bob Potter, 73, never dreamed he’d spend 47 years in retail.

    “It got in my blood and never left,” he said.

    In November 1958, he began working for Kuhn’s Variety based in Nashville.

  • This Digital Life: Consuming by tablet, producing by computer

    With great fanfare Apple released its new iPad last week.

    I want one. You probably want one. It broke some already impressive records for initial sales with more than 3 million sold in the first three days it was available.

    Tablet computers are the latest high-tech, must-have items, and the iPad tops that list.

  • On alert for safety: Doug Finlay proceeds with compassion

    When the tornado sirens blare, not everyone runs for cover.

    It’s a sure bet Doug Finlay, Hardin County deputy emergency management director, will be in the thick of things.

    “The biggest part of my role is planning for disasters,” Finlay said.

    Part of the planning he does involves coordinating communication between various agencies, such as fire departments, search and rescue teams, and the sheriff’s department. Often it means setting up an emergency operations center at the Emergency Management Services building.

  • Fulfilling a destiny: The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim took a leap of faith

    The Rev. Hyungsool Joseph Kim’s journey to the pulpit in America was full of events he describes as “miraculous.”

    Rev. Joe, as his parishioners call him, came to the United States in 2001.

    He was born in a small town on the eastern coast of South Korea.

    “I was a country boy,” Kim said.

    His father was a farmer who grew vegetables. Kim was the youngest in the family with four brothers and two sisters.