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Monday's Man

  • Rineyville man part of space race, science history

    Not many can say they helped man set foot on the moon. Edwin Snyder is a local man who can make that claim.

    Snyder, of Rineyville, worked for more than 20 years with IBM, which led to working seven years with NASA during the 1960s and the Saturn Apollo phase of the space program.

    He was there when Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong landed on the moon.

    “It was tremendous and I felt really blessed that the Lord allowed me to be a part of it,” said Snyder, 85.

  • From grounds to graduates: E'town man worked his way up at ECTC

    If Bryan Smith had taken the advice of some of his high school teachers, he might have gone to trade or vocational school.

    They told him some students were not suited for college. Smith wanted to show those teachers they were wrong.

    “I sort of took that as a challenge,” said Smith, who is 51.

    The Elizabethtown resident is registrar at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, having earned a master’s and education specialist degrees.

  • Randy Acton, service to his country and his community

    Randy Acton’s commitment to service to his country and his community have been evident throughout his life.

    An Army veteran, Acton was president and CEO of U.S. Cavalry for 31 years and is involved in a variety of community organizations supporting the members of the military and their families.

    Acton moved back to Hardin County after finishing his military service because he and his wife, Patsy, liked the area when he was previously stationed at Fort Knox during his basic armor officer training.

  • Hobby, lifestyle rope in dental surgeon

    Thirty-nine-year-old Noah Embry is both a healer and a heeler.

    As an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, Embry applies his medical skills to help patients heal from facial injuries, among other things. As a rodeo hobbyist, Embry applies his cowboy skills to events such as team roping, in which he often serves as heeler — the person roping the hind legs of a steer.

  • Navy veteran Jarrett gives back to others who served

    Dave Jarrett is a U.S. Navy veteran in a sea of Army veterans in Hardin County.

    Jarrett, 66, began his Navy career at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. After graduation in 1969, his first ship went to the Middle East and he visited many ports on the Indian Ocean.

  • Eye of the storm uncovers heart of a volunteer

    Eight years ago, Hurricane Katrina took many things away from former Louisiana resident Doug Frederick: his home, his security and most of his personal belongings.

    But the devastating storm also gave him something: an appreciation for each day and the motivation to volunteer.

    “You know where you’ve been, so you know you can give back,” Frederick said.

  • Some random thoughts ...

    I have found column ideas in a lot of places in my lifetime. From fields of play to listening to music to going home where I grew up to watching the every move of our granddaughters.

    I even found one recently in the checkout line at McDonald’s in Elizabethtown.

    Sometimes I do my best thinking when I have a clear mind, such as Wednesday while driving on U.S. 31W when I asked myself, “What can I write about?”

    So it became a smorgasbord of thoughts in the few miles it took for me to drive to Cheddar’s and back.

  • The Art of Performance: California Chrome provides a smart performance

    By Dr. Keith Wilson

    The Kentucky Derby is the most exciting two minutes in sports. Before the race, everyone has  the dream they can win. Dreamers focus on stories of well-known horses that win like Secretariat. And of course there are the stories that keep every long shot believing they are the next Mine That Bird, which won despite 50-to-1 odds.

  • The Art of Performance: Keep calm and shoot free throws

    Dr. Keith Wilson

    This was a disappointing week for basketball fans in Kentucky. The Wildcats lost in the NCAA championship game by a score of 60-54. One obvious difference was free throws. Connecticut made 10 of 10 free throws and Kentucky made only 13 of 24. Kentucky missed several front-end of 1-1 free throw situations in the second half when making two foul shots would have changed the game completely.

  • For Your Health: What does your local health department do for you?

    Even before the days of plague in Europe and disease epidemics that devastated entire populations, we, as human beings, have searched for ways to make the world a healthier and safer place to live, while at the same time increasing our lifespan. In recent history, doctors and scientists have made discoveries that have given us an understanding of how diseases can be transmitted as well as how to prevent and treat them.