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Monday's Man

  • For Your Health: Take these steps to stick to your goals

    The New Year is just a month old and hopefully your resolutions still are going strong. If they’re not, here are some tips to sustain your 2014 goals.

    Just start. There are some days when you don’t feel like heading out the door for a run, or figuring out your budget or whatever it is you’re supposed to do that day to meet your goal. Instead of thinking about how hard it is and how long it will take, tell yourself you just have to start.

  • Trying times can reveal best, worst in people

    It is in the most difficult of times when true character is revealed. This is when you really begin to know what people are all about, how their hearts beat and who they share their hearts with.

    We are all faced with good times and bad. I have always believed to fully appreciate the good times you have to endure some bad times.

    Life often is unfair, as we know, but life is always good.

  • From the Cheap Seats: Fun outdoors always beats Xbox session

    Kids today really don't know what they're missing by opting for indoor games over what you can do outdoors.

    When was the last time you saw a bunch of kids walking to a ball field to just play baseball or softball? How about soccer or football?

    Rarely, I would guess, is your answer because it certainly is mine.

  • The Art of Performance - Bridgewater: An example of what’s right in college football

    The academic challenge of talented NCAA athletes in the revenue producing sports of football and basketball recently was investigated by CNN.

    The news report revealed that at least 7 percent of collegiate athletes in the revenue sports leave college reading at or below an eighth-grade level. It is not possible to do college level work with an eighth-grade reading ability.

    This column is not about the failures of collegiate football and basketball but rather it highlights an example of collegiate athletics at its best.

  • The Art of Performance: New Year’s challenge: Follow the Jimmy Fallon example

    Jan. 1 presents a new challenge each year. We feel compelled to set up resolutions, which sound so good and usually fall by the wayside very quickly.

    The problem with New Year’s resolutions is the process used to create them.

    Most people create them as a response to pressure other people put on them. It is one of those “should” things. We “should” make New Year’s resolutions. There is not much commitment to this style of goal setting.

  • The Art of Performance: Give yourself a holiday gift

    The holiday season brings with it many joys and challenges. It is supposed to be the time when families gather and share in the cheer of the season. There are many ways to celebrate during the holiday season and each of them has its own special heritage and meaning for the participants. Many share gifts as part of the season.

  • For Your Health: Take everyday meausres to fight flu

    The Centers for Disease Control recommends a three-step approach to fighting flu.

    The first and most important step is to get a flu vaccination each year.

    But if you get the flu, there are prescription antiviral drugs that can treat your illness. Early treatment especially is important for the elderly, the very young, people with certain chronic health conditions and pregnant women.

    Finally, everyday preventive actions can slow the spread of germs that cause respiratory — nose, throat and lungs — illnesses such as flu.

  • Some lessons learned result in embracing family and a couch

    There is a simplicity to life when you’re nearing 54 years of age.

    I guess I get that from my parents.

    They never worried about living in a big expensive house or having new vehicles in the driveway. Shoot, they never even had a credit card.

    So I have never worried about material things as a means of satisfaction. But, we do have a few credit cards that remind us we have them once a month.

  • The Art of Performance: Big Papi finishes first

    We often think high-level performers cannot be nice or compassionate people. The World Series provided a great example of high-level performance and a positive personality working together. David Ortiz has been an invaluable player for the Boston Red Sox for more than 10 years. He is known as “Big Papi” because he is 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 230 pounds.

  • For Your Health: Don’t drive while drowsy

    Most people are aware of the dangers of driving while intoxicated, but many do not know drowsiness also impairs judgment, performance and reaction times just like alcohol and drugs.