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Monday's Man

  • Trying times can reveal best, worst in people

    It is in the most difficult of times when true character is revealed. This is when you really begin to know what people are all about, how their hearts beat and who they share their hearts with.

    We are all faced with good times and bad. I have always believed to fully appreciate the good times you have to endure some bad times.

    Life often is unfair, as we know, but life is always good.

  • From the Cheap Seats: Fun outdoors always beats Xbox session

    Kids today really don't know what they're missing by opting for indoor games over what you can do outdoors.

    When was the last time you saw a bunch of kids walking to a ball field to just play baseball or softball? How about soccer or football?

    Rarely, I would guess, is your answer because it certainly is mine.

  • The Art of Performance - Bridgewater: An example of what’s right in college football

    The academic challenge of talented NCAA athletes in the revenue producing sports of football and basketball recently was investigated by CNN.

    The news report revealed that at least 7 percent of collegiate athletes in the revenue sports leave college reading at or below an eighth-grade level. It is not possible to do college level work with an eighth-grade reading ability.

    This column is not about the failures of collegiate football and basketball but rather it highlights an example of collegiate athletics at its best.

  • Helping students learn with Legos

    Bill Clagett Sr. uses his engineering knowledge and love of Legos to help students at T.K. Stone Middle School build a brighter future though Lego League.

    Before his 35-year career as a local dentist, Clagett studied chemical engineering. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and served one year in Vietnam before using the G.I. Bill to go to dental school.

    But he always enjoyed engineering. When his children were little, he played with Legos with them. That interest stuck with him and with his children.

  • Mission trips, troubled youth among pastor's service

    At 44, Hodgenville resident DeWayne Gibson has travelled on mission trips around the world, lost 120 pounds in seven months and helped troubled youth, all of which he ties to his faith.

    “I just really want to serve God,” Gibson said.

    Born at Hardin Memorial Hospital and raised in Glendale, Gibson, pastor at Parkway Baptist Church in Hodgenville, worked in student ministry for 24 years. Prior to his current role, he worked at First Baptist Church in Hodgenville and Buffalo Baptist Church.

  • The Art of Performance: New Year’s challenge: Follow the Jimmy Fallon example

    Jan. 1 presents a new challenge each year. We feel compelled to set up resolutions, which sound so good and usually fall by the wayside very quickly.

    The problem with New Year’s resolutions is the process used to create them.

    Most people create them as a response to pressure other people put on them. It is one of those “should” things. We “should” make New Year’s resolutions. There is not much commitment to this style of goal setting.

  • Deep friendships left unchanged after 30 years

    Ever wonder what turn your life may have taken if you didn’t meet someone?

    I have been thinking about that a lot the last few months, pretty much ever since it was decided that after more than 30 years removed from seeing each other, my two very best friends and I from college would meet on campus, where our lives were in many ways shaped.

    It has been a long 30 years since we graduated from Morehead State University and went in our own directions.

  • Community keeps T.J. Rhoades going

    Hardin County struck a chord with T.J. Rhoades many years ago.

    The musician, philanthropist and insurance agent strives to give back to the community he calls home.

    Rhoades, who has been with State Farm for 23 years, became an agent in Elizabethtown in 1996.

    He wants his office to be a hometown agency where he knows his customers and thinks of them like family, becoming involved in their lives, he said.

  • Memory-filled Christmas tree stands the test of time

    For a few weeks a year, it sits on our dining room table without too much notice most of the time.

    The rest of the year, the nearly 2-foot high ceramic Christmas tree is delicately placed in a downstairs closet with many of our other decorations, waiting to be unwrapped once again.

    At more than 30 years of age, it shows very little wear and tear from its broad travels including four houses, two apartments and two countries.

  • Elizabethtown 'compiler' finds joy preserving history

    Gary Kempf has a history of compiling history.

    The Elizabethtown resident has several books to his name, including works about Elizabethtown, Vine Grove and West Point.

    But he doesn’t consider himself an author.

    “I’m not a writer; I’m a compiler,” Kempf said.

    As a compiler, Kempf’s name can be found on works such as “Methodism in Elizabethtown, KY — And Some Other Things of Interest,” “The History of Vine Grove, Kentucky” and “West Point, KY & The Brickyard.”