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Monday's Man

  • Randy Acton, service to his country and his community

    Randy Acton’s commitment to service to his country and his community have been evident throughout his life.

    An Army veteran, Acton was president and CEO of U.S. Cavalry for 31 years and is involved in a variety of community organizations supporting the members of the military and their families.

    Acton moved back to Hardin County after finishing his military service because he and his wife, Patsy, liked the area when he was previously stationed at Fort Knox during his basic armor officer training.

  • Hobby, lifestyle rope in dental surgeon

    Thirty-nine-year-old Noah Embry is both a healer and a heeler.

    As an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, Embry applies his medical skills to help patients heal from facial injuries, among other things. As a rodeo hobbyist, Embry applies his cowboy skills to events such as team roping, in which he often serves as heeler — the person roping the hind legs of a steer.

  • Some lessons learned result in embracing family and a couch

    There is a simplicity to life when you’re nearing 54 years of age.

    I guess I get that from my parents.

    They never worried about living in a big expensive house or having new vehicles in the driveway. Shoot, they never even had a credit card.

    So I have never worried about material things as a means of satisfaction. But, we do have a few credit cards that remind us we have them once a month.

  • The Art of Performance: Big Papi finishes first

    We often think high-level performers cannot be nice or compassionate people. The World Series provided a great example of high-level performance and a positive personality working together. David Ortiz has been an invaluable player for the Boston Red Sox for more than 10 years. He is known as “Big Papi” because he is 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 230 pounds.

  • Navy veteran Jarrett gives back to others who served

    Dave Jarrett is a U.S. Navy veteran in a sea of Army veterans in Hardin County.

    Jarrett, 66, began his Navy career at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. After graduation in 1969, his first ship went to the Middle East and he visited many ports on the Indian Ocean.

  • For Your Health: Don’t drive while drowsy

    Most people are aware of the dangers of driving while intoxicated, but many do not know drowsiness also impairs judgment, performance and reaction times just like alcohol and drugs.

  • Pawley: Heart of Bruin athletics

    There is no doubt Justin Pawley loves Central Hardin High School athletics. Pawley, who has Down syndrome, has been involved with Central Hardin sports since he was a team manger in high school and became an honorary coach after graduating in 1999.

    He’s been with the boys' soccer team for 20 years and the boys' basketball team for 18.

    “All I ever wanted to do is coach,” Pawley said.

    Soccer coach Mike Wiersema said his pregame talks are legendary.

  • One day loaded with emotional conflict

    The day of Oct. 7 is always a battle in my mind and in my heart. I dread that day each year.

    It's nothing close to the torment that my father must surely feel as he emotionally is pulled in two extreme directions. The day is his birth date and the anniversary of his wife's death.

  • Volunteer focuses on service, not disability

    When you first meet James Best you might see a name badge that signifies he volunteers at the Elizabethtown American Red Cross.

    Or you might notice a black rubber wrist band that sports the name of a favorite wrestler.

    You might even see him driving down the street.

    Or if you’re like others Best meets, you might see only his disability.

  • Guy Wallace strives to repay hometown's kindness

    Guy Wallace grew up in Elizabethtown and set out to give back to the community that was good to him in his childhood.

    After attending Elizabethtown High School, Wallace studied biology at University of Louisville and then went on to physical therapy school.

    He came back to Elizabethtown because he liked the community.

    “The community was good to me as a youth and I thought I’d come back and be good to the community that was good to me,” Wallace said.