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Monday's Man

  • Pawley: Heart of Bruin athletics

    There is no doubt Justin Pawley loves Central Hardin High School athletics. Pawley, who has Down syndrome, has been involved with Central Hardin sports since he was a team manger in high school and became an honorary coach after graduating in 1999.

    He’s been with the boys' soccer team for 20 years and the boys' basketball team for 18.

    “All I ever wanted to do is coach,” Pawley said.

    Soccer coach Mike Wiersema said his pregame talks are legendary.

  • One day loaded with emotional conflict

    The day of Oct. 7 is always a battle in my mind and in my heart. I dread that day each year.

    It's nothing close to the torment that my father must surely feel as he emotionally is pulled in two extreme directions. The day is his birth date and the anniversary of his wife's death.

  • Volunteer focuses on service, not disability

    When you first meet James Best you might see a name badge that signifies he volunteers at the Elizabethtown American Red Cross.

    Or you might notice a black rubber wrist band that sports the name of a favorite wrestler.

    You might even see him driving down the street.

    Or if you’re like others Best meets, you might see only his disability.

  • Guy Wallace strives to repay hometown's kindness

    Guy Wallace grew up in Elizabethtown and set out to give back to the community that was good to him in his childhood.

    After attending Elizabethtown High School, Wallace studied biology at University of Louisville and then went on to physical therapy school.

    He came back to Elizabethtown because he liked the community.

    “The community was good to me as a youth and I thought I’d come back and be good to the community that was good to me,” Wallace said.

  • The Art of Performance: Taking on helplessness

    By Dr. Keith Wilson

    One of the big factors that undermines effective performance is helplessness.

    A sense of helplessness is detrimental to the mental and physical health of an individual. People give up when they feel helpless. They believe there is no reason to keep trying. They feel defeated. This feeling could happen in a sporting competition or a work environment where the person feels powerless to influence any part of the situation.

  • P.E. teacher exercises passion for fitness

    Doing the job he wants to do is a real workout for Kermit Olive.

    The physical education teacher at Lakewood Elementary School in Stephensburg is serious about child fitness. Olive hopes to promote physical fitness not only in the school but beyond.

    “That’s what I’m striving for,” Olive said, noting it’s good to have knowledge about physical fitness, but it needs to be put to use outside the school.

  • The Art of Performance: Performing at a high level when it matters most

    Quality performance means doing your best when it matters most. It might surprise you that on Sept. 10, 2013, a high level performance took place at the Dairy Queen in Hopkins, Minn.

    Joey Prusak,19, is the manager of that Dairy Queen. He has worked there since he was 14.

  • Daniel Cox sees his hard work pay off

    A farm work ethic and desire to promote good customer service led Daniel Cox to top accolades with the Frito Lay, PepsiCo Company.

    Cox, a Howevalley native, traveled to New York City in June to be recognized with the PepsiCo Ring of Honor as a top salesman with the company at the American Museum of Natural History.

    For six years, Cox has been a route sales representative with about 20 stores on his route. Before working for Frito Lay he worked a route for Murray Cookies for 15 years.

  • Cleaning a closet unlocks a flood of memories, hats

    Who knew cleaning out a closet would unleash a wave of memories?

    I didn’t, until I started coming across things such as plaques and awards. But mostly, recollections came from baseball hats I once wore.

    The top of my closet was stuffed, so much so there really wasn’t much room for anything else.

    I should have counted how many hats I had up there. I know for certain it was more than 10 from many stages of my life in the last 10 years.

  • Investor takes on new venture

    In at least one respect, Terry Shortt has come full circle — like a doughnut.

    Last year, Shortt purchased and renovated a building just steps away from where he met his future wife in 1990.

    In November 2012, Shortt and his wife opened Leo’s Donut and Coffee House at a Radcliff landmark: the Dog n Suds drive-in restaurant. It is next to a building that housed a real estate office where he first met Andra, his wife, who had the idea to open the shop.