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Pulse

  • Marky Mark and the clunky bunch

    Despite an overwhelmingly negative response from critics, “Transformers: Age of Extinction” raked in $100 million at the box office opening weekend.

    But will audiences like what they see? The film isn’t as horrible as most critics made it out to be, but it has some problems.

    First off, it is very long. Almost three hours.

  • The sun still shines bright on 'The Stephen Foster Story'

    “The Stephen Foster Story,” a regional tradition, kicked off this month in Bardstown for its 56th season.

    “The show was much longer when it first opened, at least 2.5 hours in length,” said Billy Bass, the media and development coordinator.

    Through the years, scenes have been rearranged, music changed and some lines cut, he said.

    “The show changes every summer with new cast members and personalities, so every year the show has it’s own distinct story,” he said.

  • 'Jersey Boys' forgot it's a musical

    A few years ago, I had the joy of seeing the hit Broadway musical “Jersey Boys” live on stage. Because the musical was so good and had so much acclaim, I expected magic from Clint Eastwood’s film version.

    That’s not exactly what happened.

    It has a few problems.

    “Jersey Boys” chronicles the formation and eventual breakup of the Four Seasons but, most importantly, it tells the story of their music.

  • Local magician makes illusion his life's work

    A good magician never shares his secrets, but a great one uses them for a good cause.

    Despite performing in lucrative places such as Las Vegas, local magician Joseph “Dinky” Gowen stays close to home by performing his magic at fundraisers for places such as the Hardin County Animal Shelter, local schools and civic club.

    Gowen has performed magic since age 6. His love for magic began when his mother, a regular attendee of his earliest shows, bought him a magic kit. He said it has been a pivotal part of his life ever since.

  • Radcliff veteran publishes novel

    A Radcliff resident and retired Army veteran has published a novel.

    “The Breach ...the link...” was published April 22 by R.L. Thacker, who was born at Fort Knox.

    A single mother of three children, Thacker had written several novels and began many short stories, but “The Breach” is her first publication. Thacker, who is pursuing an associate of arts degree and a degree in psychology. said she decided to publish so her children would know nothing was out of reach.

    Her novel is available at amazon.com and createspace.com/4769135.

  • Shakespeare role in nation's capital latest for Central Hardin grad

    It wasn’t until well after he began college that Central Hardin High School graduate John Keabler began to think he might be able to have a career in acting.

    Now with TV, movie and stage roles among his credits, Keabler is plying his craft as part of Shakespeare Theatre Company in the nation’s capital in two Shakespeare productions, “Henry IV, Part 1” and “Henry IV, Part 2.” The plays run until June 8 at Sidney Harman Hall in Washington, D.C.

    Keabler shares the stage with veteran actor Stacy Keach, who portrays Falstaff.

  • Hardin County Playhouse, PAC set new seasons

    All the world’s a stage, especially at the Hardin County Playhouse and Hardin County Schools’ Performing Arts Center at John Hardin High School.

    The 2014-15 season has been set and a variety of musical and dramatic offerings are planned for young and old.

    The HCP season opens in August with Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock opera “Jesus Christ Superstar.”

  • Denise Lemke gets fired up to make glass beads

    FOR MORE INFORMATION: To learn more about the lampwork glass beads made by Vine Grove resident Denise Lemke, visit caravancreations.net.

    Near an open flame in the kitchen of her Vine Grove residence, Denise Lemke held a stick-like implement known as a mandrel in one hand and a glass rod in the other.

    She drew the rod to the fire provided by an oxygen propane torch until the glass melted and carefully wrapped the material onto the mandrel, which she twirled.

    “This is a hobby you have to be very patient with,” Lemke said.

  • Poor Man's Grave: A band of bankers that rock

    What do three bankers and a guy named Banks do in their spare time? Form a band, of course.

    Chris Buchanan, Charles DeRoche, Matt Neel and Pat Banks make up the local band Poor Man’s Grave.

    While their photos resemble those of many folk bands, they started out that way, but morphed into something louder and more electric, according to Buchanan, lead vocalist and acoustic guitar player.

  • Betty Campbell brings memories to life on canvas

    Local artist Betty Campbell’s memories of Holland will be on exhibit at B. Deemer Gallery in Louisville.

    The exhibit, called “Remembering Holland,” will include about 14 paintings drawn from reflections from a trip that left a great impression on Campbell.

    “I cannot express to you the dignity, quietness and beauty of this country,” she said. “I was absolutely in awe.”

    The paintings are landscapes of the countryside filled with sheep, openness and windmills.