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Pulse

  • Making their point: Gene and Barbara Baskett create custom knives

    In his workshop behind his house in Eastview, Gene Baskett is just as likely to be holding mammoth ivory as he is steel.

    For the last 32 years, Baskett has been making custom knives, a craft rooted in an interest that can be traced back many years.

    “Boys like knives,” he explained.

    Baskett, owner of Baskett Custom Knives, joined The Knifemaker’s Guild in 1981 — a year after he started making custom knives — and now sits on the board of directors for the organization.

  • Free concert Sunday honors military

    A free concert honoring members of the military and their families is Sunday at the corner of Vine Street and Woodland Drive in Radcliff.

    Unlimited, Peacemakers, Salsa Rhythms and Come Together Band perform at the event from 3 to 6:30 p.m.

    The bands’ musical genres include gospel, salsa, R&B and jazz.

    While the concert is free and open to the public, donations are accepted. Proceeds benefit Dollars for Dukes and the American Red Cross, sponsor Jeff Kennedy said.

  • 'Golden' opportunity for fun tonight at State Theater

    If the names Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia are familiar favorites, you’re in for some killer entertainment Saturday night at the Historic State Theater.

    “The Golden Girls” Murder Mystery Dinner starts at 7 p.m. in the First Federal Gallery Banquet Room.

    Actors from Lexington group Fantastical Theatricals portray television’s comedic quartet, and audience members have an opportunity to interact with them as a murder mystery unfolds.

  • Tornado wrecks a town, but not a community

    On the southern side of Kenton County, there’s a little community called Piner. There’s an elementary school, a corner market, some churches and not much else but homes and farms.

    Every time I drive through Stephensburg, I think about Piner. I think about my grandma, Mary Ruth, and everyone in Piner.

    Piner was devastated when tornadoes ripped through the region March 3. A volunteer coordinator estimated 100 homes were destroyed and another 250 families were affected. Four people died.

  • 'John Carter' a nice surprise

    I have to begin this review with a confession. I didn’t realize Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote anything beyond his work with Tarzan. But through the introduction of Disney’s “John Carter” I learned Burroughs wrote a work that inspired much of modern science fiction.

  • 'The Music Man' marches into the Historic State Theater

    A con artist visits Elizabethtown when the Historic State Theater presents a screening of “The Music Man” this weekend.

    The movie was shown Friday night and presentations Saturday are at 2 and 7 p.m.

    “The Music Man” is a 1962 musical featuring Robert Preston as Harold Hill, a con artist who plans to bilk the town out of money. His plan is to offer to equip and train a marching band with no intention of staying around after getting the money.

  • Down on 5th: Not your father's bluegrass

    Down on 5th members acknowledge they are not your father’s bluegrass band, describing themselves as progressive.

    Band members hail from all over central Kentucky. Banjo player Joe Larson is from Munfordville, guitarist Marke Richardson is from Shepherdsville, Dennis Haycraft, on mandolin, is from Leitchfield, Fiddle player J.B. Miller is from Hartford and bass player Kelsie Westfall lives in Cecilia.

  • Second Saturday showcases local art

    Art is the theme for this weekend’s Second Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. in downtown Elizabethtown.

  • Allegro presents Disney's 'Beauty and the Beast Jr.'

    Allegro Dance Studio’s musical theater presents Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” on Friday at the Hardin County School’s Performing Arts Center at John Hardin High School.

    The junior version is only 65 minutes long but the entire story and all songs are included, just shortened, said Carol Zagar, director of Allegro Dance Theatre, which is producing the show.

    There are 45 Allegro students ages 6 to 18 in the cast. Also in the cast are three men.

  • 'The Lorax' has nice visuals but environmental theme is overshadowed

    The creators of “Despicable Me” have attempted to celebrate Dr. Seuss with the release of “The Lorax.”

    The title character, the Lorax, speaks for the trees in an environmentally conscious film based on Seuss’ book.

    As the story begins, a young boy named Ted lives in a plastic and toxic world where residents have to buy bottled fresh air. Ted begins a quest to find a real tree to impress a girl, Audrey, voiced by country music star Taylor Swift.