.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Pulse

  • Fiddle competition, festivities come to Grayson County

    Grab your fiddle and head to Leitchfield this weekend for a festival showcasing Kentucky's bluegrass roots.

    The highlight of the two-day event is the Twin Lakes National Fiddler Championship.

    Other activities include a bluegrass band contest, clogging, jig and buck dancing, a car show and the Fiddle Queen Pageant, organizers said.

    The pageant is at 6 p.m. Friday and the rest of the events are Saturday. The fiddle contest begins at 10 a.m. on the courthouse square.

  • When you propose, ‘Anything Goes’

    In theater, a variety of roles come together to make one successful show. If any of those roles are missing, no matter how small, something would be missing from the whole of the production.

    That’s where many cast members of the Youth Theatre of Hardin County’s production of “Anything Goes” come in.

    “Anything Goes” is a Cole Porter musical that takes place on a passenger ship and features popular songs “I Get a Kick out of You,” “You’re the Top” and “Anything Goes.”

  • 'Annie Get Your Gun,' actors get your scripts

    If you’ve been bitten by the acting bug, auditions for the Hardin County School’s Performing Arts Center at John Hardin High School pro-am musical might be for you.

    This year’s musical is “Annie Get Your Gun.” The story is based on the life of Annie Oakley, her sharpshooting days with “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show” and romance with Frank Butler.

    The production needs a cast of four to six children younger than 14 and six to 10 high school students and adults.

  • Theater production focuses on legendary coach

    The phrase “making a play” takes on a different meaning as Hall of Fame football coach Vince Lombardi is the featured subject in a current theater production.

    Presented by Kentucky Repertory Theatre in Horse Cave, “Lombardi” tells the story of the life of the legendary coach for which the Super Bowl trophy ultimately was named.

  • 'The Artist' is a gem

    “The Artist” tells the tale of a silent film actor refusing to enter the world of talking pictures.

    In the early days of film, this was a common story. In silent films, the acting was about expression and physical drama. An actor never needed to learn an accent, didn’t worry about flubbing lines or anything verbal in the film. Many were scared of talking pictures. They weren’t sure audiences would like them as much in full sound.

    “The Artist” portrays this time period well.

  • Coffee and doughnuts, anyone?

    It was only a matter of time.

    A few weeks ago I saw a news story on a morning show that told of a study done in Tel Aviv in which researchers found that participants who ate a doughnut or piece of cake or other dessert after breakfast were more likely to lose weight than those who did not. That news story was paired with another out of Boston that said drinking two cups of coffee a day resulted in a lower risk of heart failure.

    I must admit I was amused at the stories and found myself laughing out loud.

    Why, you ask?

  • 'Three Coin' plays at the State Theater

    The Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown will feature the classic film “Three Coins in the Fountain” (1954) this weekend.

    Staring Clifton Webb and Dorothy McGuire, the story is a romantic comedy about three American women in Italy wishing for their prince charming. The ladies throw coins into the Trevi Fountain in Rome to help their chances.

    The film is the winner of two Academy Awards, Best Cinematography (color) and Best Original Song for Frank Sinatra’s title song. It also was nominated for Best Picture. 

  • Hardin County native crosses bridge to national concert tour

    The day after his 30th birthday, Hardin County native Shawn Holcomb found himself on stage with his band at a Texas venue playing on a nationally-known rock tour.

    Like Bridges We Burn, a rock band, played Tuesday at Vans Warped Tour in Dallas, as the result of entering Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands 16. After online voting earned them a spot in the top 100 bands for the Dallas area, Like Bridges We Burn and the other 99 bands went before a panel of judges.

    “We were one of four bands picked out of the Dallas area to play,” Holcomb said.

  • Child expenses report kills hope for future

    A recent report on the cost of raising children dealt a crushing blow to parents.

    Analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed middle-income families with children born in 2011 can expect to spend $234,900 before inflation over the next 17 years. That should cover food, housing, education and child care and other expenses.

    Middle-income families, for purposes of the report, earn between $59,410 and $102,870. Families earning less spend less; families earning more spend more.

  • The slightly amazing Spider Man

    Spider-Man is back in web-slinging action with Andrew Garfield (“The Social Network”) donning the mask.

    Socially awkward Peter Parker is bitten by a spider that turns him into the arachnid hero. The film continues the story of a smart, orphaned kid fighting villains, who usually are the product of science experiments gone wrong.