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Pulse

  • Theater production focuses on legendary coach

    The phrase “making a play” takes on a different meaning as Hall of Fame football coach Vince Lombardi is the featured subject in a current theater production.

    Presented by Kentucky Repertory Theatre in Horse Cave, “Lombardi” tells the story of the life of the legendary coach for which the Super Bowl trophy ultimately was named.

  • 'The Artist' is a gem

    “The Artist” tells the tale of a silent film actor refusing to enter the world of talking pictures.

    In the early days of film, this was a common story. In silent films, the acting was about expression and physical drama. An actor never needed to learn an accent, didn’t worry about flubbing lines or anything verbal in the film. Many were scared of talking pictures. They weren’t sure audiences would like them as much in full sound.

    “The Artist” portrays this time period well.

  • Coffee and doughnuts, anyone?

    It was only a matter of time.

    A few weeks ago I saw a news story on a morning show that told of a study done in Tel Aviv in which researchers found that participants who ate a doughnut or piece of cake or other dessert after breakfast were more likely to lose weight than those who did not. That news story was paired with another out of Boston that said drinking two cups of coffee a day resulted in a lower risk of heart failure.

    I must admit I was amused at the stories and found myself laughing out loud.

    Why, you ask?

  • 'Three Coin' plays at the State Theater

    The Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown will feature the classic film “Three Coins in the Fountain” (1954) this weekend.

    Staring Clifton Webb and Dorothy McGuire, the story is a romantic comedy about three American women in Italy wishing for their prince charming. The ladies throw coins into the Trevi Fountain in Rome to help their chances.

    The film is the winner of two Academy Awards, Best Cinematography (color) and Best Original Song for Frank Sinatra’s title song. It also was nominated for Best Picture. 

  • Hardin County native crosses bridge to national concert tour

    The day after his 30th birthday, Hardin County native Shawn Holcomb found himself on stage with his band at a Texas venue playing on a nationally-known rock tour.

    Like Bridges We Burn, a rock band, played Tuesday at Vans Warped Tour in Dallas, as the result of entering Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands 16. After online voting earned them a spot in the top 100 bands for the Dallas area, Like Bridges We Burn and the other 99 bands went before a panel of judges.

    “We were one of four bands picked out of the Dallas area to play,” Holcomb said.

  • Child expenses report kills hope for future

    A recent report on the cost of raising children dealt a crushing blow to parents.

    Analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed middle-income families with children born in 2011 can expect to spend $234,900 before inflation over the next 17 years. That should cover food, housing, education and child care and other expenses.

    Middle-income families, for purposes of the report, earn between $59,410 and $102,870. Families earning less spend less; families earning more spend more.

  • The slightly amazing Spider Man

    Spider-Man is back in web-slinging action with Andrew Garfield (“The Social Network”) donning the mask.

    Socially awkward Peter Parker is bitten by a spider that turns him into the arachnid hero. The film continues the story of a smart, orphaned kid fighting villains, who usually are the product of science experiments gone wrong.

  • Rocker to salute troops, families at Elizabethtown Founders' Day

    As Elizabethtown celebrates its roots at Founders’ Day on July 4, guests will be treated to a blast from the more recent past.

    Musician John Parr, an England native best known for his ’80s hits “Naughty Naughty” and “St. Elmo’s Fire (Man in Motion),” headlines a concert at the event.

    “I am honored to be a part of this very national but personal event,” Parr said.

  • E’town photographer receives international recognition

    An Elizabethtown man has earned international recognition for his black and white photography.

    David Tockzo was among those nominated by an international jury for the seventh annual Black and White Spider Awards held June 9.

    Tockzo’s entry was titled “I Know Thy Grief” and captured a mourner at the funeral for Sgt. Matthew Deckard, an Elizabethtown soldier who died in 2005 while serving in Iraq. The photo was a nominee in the category Photojournalism/Professional.

  • The secret life of Honest Abe

    I can’t believe I am going to say this, but there’s a part of me that liked “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.”

    At least what I saw of it when I wasn’t hiding my eyes from the bloodbath. Seriously, I’m not sure people actually have that much blood in them to splatter when struck with an ax.

    Don’t get me wrong, this film is totally moronic in premise and in what you view on film, but seeing one of the greatest presidents of all time welding an ax is kind of cool in a weird way.