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Today's Features

  • “The Stephen Foster Story,” a regional tradition, kicked off this month in Bardstown for its 56th season.

    “The show was much longer when it first opened, at least 2.5 hours in length,” said Billy Bass, the media and development coordinator.

    Through the years, scenes have been rearranged, music changed and some lines cut, he said.

    “The show changes every summer with new cast members and personalities, so every year the show has it’s own distinct story,” he said.

  • A few years ago, I had the joy of seeing the hit Broadway musical “Jersey Boys” live on stage. Because the musical was so good and had so much acclaim, I expected magic from Clint Eastwood’s film version.

    That’s not exactly what happened.

    It has a few problems.

    “Jersey Boys” chronicles the formation and eventual breakup of the Four Seasons but, most importantly, it tells the story of their music.

  • For my birthday, I got a gift that keeps giving.

    Giving me problems, that is.

    Now, before I go any further, I have to be clear about a couple of things. First, the gift was a great item I had asked for and was not the source of the problems. Also, the experience to which I’m referring was not typical of the experiences I’ve had in the past when dealing with this company.

    That said, let me tell you about Cell-mageddon.

  • Claire Allen knows her way around a stage.

    Not only has Allen acted upon that stage for Hardin County Playhouse, she also has painted sets and worked in various roles behind the scenes.

    “I painted several sets before I started acting,” Allen said.

    Additionally, Allen is president of the HCP board of directors. She has been a member of the board since late 2008.

    Allen recalled that first role as part of an ensemble in an HCP production of “The Sound of Music.”

    “I was a nun,” Allen said.

  • Nobody say it too loudly, but I think we might have turned a corner with my daughter.

    Sort of.

    I mean, she still can throw down with the best and toughest of them and will let us know when she’s not happy we don’t allow her to do something she’s convinced she’s perfectly capable of doing by herself. Like jump off the dining room table.

    Although, really, she has a perfect landing, so I probably should encourage more jumping off furniture. And cars. And trees. And whatever else is high and guaranteed to cause heart palpitations.

  • While the Elizabethtown Police Department is cleaning up the streets, David Berry takes pride in keeping their building in tip-top shape.

    Berry, 69, started working with the city in November of 1992 and for the past decade has been the custodian for EPD after the construction of its current station.

    “This is probably the best job I’ve ever had,” he said. “I wouldn’t leave it for anything.”

    Part of the reason he loves his job are the people he works with. He said they are the “top of the line.”

  • FOR MORE: To see the work of artist Amber Gardner, visit her page on Facebook, Dragonflypoppy Creations.

     

    After putting aside her artistic aspirations in order to serve in the Air Force, Buffalo resident Amber Gardner now has immersed herself in her art.

    At her home studio, Gardner creates watercolor paintings, steampunk-style jewelry and leather items for her business Dragonflypoppy Creations. Although her business is relatively new, her interest in art goes back many years.

  • Christy Pritchard looks toward the future with knowledge from the past in her work as an archaeologist and while volunteering with the Elizabethtown Heritage Council.

    She is the archaeology project manager for the Kentucky office of Brockington and Associates and on the board of directors of the Heritage Council.

  • An unplanned teachng assignment may have temporarily detoured him from the path of history and photography, but Elvin Smith Jr. found his way back soon enough.

    A 1960 graduate of Rineyville High School, Smith attended Western Kentucky University where he majored in elementary education with a minor in physical education. He graduated in 1965 and earned a master’s degree in 1967.

    Smith began his 30-year career as a teacher at Maceo Elementary School in Daviess County.

    “I was supposed to teach science and history,” Smith said.

  • Although she lives in a subdivision, agriculture is important in Rebecca Mackey’s life.