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Today's Features

  • Pat Clark and Hardin County AM Rotary President Daniel Tabb, left, welcome Sherry Murphy, executive director of Elizabethtown Tourism to the Dec. 13 meeting. Murphy spoke about the positive economic impact tourism has had to the community over the last year.

  • While the map shows 160 miles between Rowan County Senior High School and the community of Vine Grove, the two became much closer, thanks to the partnership between Vine Grove and Rowan County’s Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors.

  • The Fort Knox Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America held its monthly meeting Dec. 18 at the MOAA Clubhouse on Fort Knox.

    The guest speaker was Gilda Hill, executive director of the Office of Kentucky Veterans Centers as part of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs in Frankfort. She is responsible for the veteran’s cemeteries and the veteran’s centers or nursing homes.

  • It’s New Year’s Eve so you better get your black-eyed peas soaking.

    One New Year’s Day tradition includes black-eyed peas and cabbage. It is said the peas symbolize prosperity because they swell as they cook and the greens, in this case cabbage, symbolize money.

  • Mention the smells of Christmas and most people have little trouble ticking off their favorites: The perfume of evergreen, the citrusy smell of fruit in the Christmas stockings, cinnamon spice tea brewing, the aroma of gingerbread cookies and pumpkin bread baking.

    So popular are these smells that they’ve been packaged in Christmas aerosol sprays, candles and refresher oils.

    Not so with the New Year. 

  • Once upon a time there was a little girl who dreamed big dreams. She grew up on a farm in rural Kentucky but her dreams spread far across the stars.

    There were many things she dreamed of becoming and most of them were drawn from things she had seen in a film or read in a book. Oh, the dangers of reading a book, to believe in the impossible.

  • Crediting her work to a “servant’s heart,” Rebecca Farris Allen, executive director of Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties, believes there’s more to her role than just a job.

    “I feel it’s like an opportunity to be a missionary here at home,” Allen said.

    Several years ago, when her father-in-law was on a ventilator, Allen became aware of how important nurses were. She pursued that occupation and worked for a little more than 13 years at Hardin Memorial Hospital.

  • At 44, Hodgenville resident DeWayne Gibson has travelled on mission trips around the world, lost 120 pounds in seven months and helped troubled youth, all of which he ties to his faith.

    “I just really want to serve God,” Gibson said.

    Born at Hardin Memorial Hospital and raised in Glendale, Gibson, pastor at Parkway Baptist Church in Hodgenville, worked in student ministry for 24 years. Prior to his current role, he worked at First Baptist Church in Hodgenville and Buffalo Baptist Church.

  • Jan. 1 presents a new challenge each year. We feel compelled to set up resolutions, which sound so good and usually fall by the wayside very quickly.

    The problem with New Year’s resolutions is the process used to create them.

    Most people create them as a response to pressure other people put on them. It is one of those “should” things. We “should” make New Year’s resolutions. There is not much commitment to this style of goal setting.