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Today's Features

  • The Potted Few Garden Club recently met in the Elizabethtown home of Ria Malito. Malito provided a program on how to raise orchids without a greenhouse. Co-host Bonnie Gunter assisted in the preparation and presided over the business meeting.

  • A year’s worth of fundraising and contributions have come to fruition with the award of the annual Radcliff Rotary scholarships. One of the club’s major areas of service, the $1,000 scholarships, one each to a North Hardin and a Fort Knox senior, has been awarded annually since the club’s founding in 1975. The students are nominated by their guidance counselors and their applications are reviewed and evaluated by a panel of club members for selection of the winners.

  • The following property transfers are listed on deeds at the Hardin County Clerk’s Office in Elizabethtown. FMV means fair market value and typically is based upon assessed taxable value.

    Christine M. and John Roberson to Joseph Eldon and Dena Collins, property at Vine Street and Logsdon Parkway in Radcliff, $230,000.

    Dwight Preston to Taylor Kindervater, property along Constantine Road near Ky. 86, $220,000.

  • Elizabethtown Mayor Edna Berger signed the National Garden week proclamation May 27 reaffirming the mission and purpose of the Elizabethtown Garden club here in the community. Several Garden Club of Elizabethtown members were on site to witness the affirmation.

  • Hardin County Farm Bureau is offering a free movie showing today at the Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown.

    “Farmland” will be shown at 7:30 p.m. today at the theater at 209 W. Dixie Ave.

    With the support of the U.S. Farmers & Ran­chers Alliance, award-winning director James Moll traveled across the country meeting with farmers and ranchers in their 20s who are responsible for running their farming businesses. The film offers a first-hand glimpse into their lives.

  • A few years ago, I had the joy of seeing the hit Broadway musical “Jersey Boys” live on stage. Because the musical was so good and had so much acclaim, I expected magic from Clint Eastwood’s film version.

    That’s not exactly what happened.

    It has a few problems.

    “Jersey Boys” chronicles the formation and eventual breakup of the Four Seasons but, most importantly, it tells the story of their music.

  • For my birthday, I got a gift that keeps giving.

    Giving me problems, that is.

    Now, before I go any further, I have to be clear about a couple of things. First, the gift was a great item I had asked for and was not the source of the problems. Also, the experience to which I’m referring was not typical of the experiences I’ve had in the past when dealing with this company.

    That said, let me tell you about Cell-mageddon.

  • The following building permit information has been obtained from Hardin County Planning and Development Commission and the City of Elizabethtown Planning and Development offices. The name of the applicant, applicant’s address and use of permit are listed.

    James D. Harris, 80 Mayfield Court, Elizabethtown. Use: attached accessory structure.

    Steve Brummitt, 1095 Summit-Eastview Road, Eastview. Use: detached accessory structure.

    Dale Doolin, 1589 Burns Road, Radcliff. Use: detached accessory structure.

  • Claire Allen knows her way around a stage.

    Not only has Allen acted upon that stage for Hardin County Playhouse, she also has painted sets and worked in various roles behind the scenes.

    “I painted several sets before I started acting,” Allen said.

    Additionally, Allen is president of the HCP board of directors. She has been a member of the board since late 2008.

    Allen recalled that first role as part of an ensemble in an HCP production of “The Sound of Music.”

    “I was a nun,” Allen said.

  • Nobody say it too loudly, but I think we might have turned a corner with my daughter.

    Sort of.

    I mean, she still can throw down with the best and toughest of them and will let us know when she’s not happy we don’t allow her to do something she’s convinced she’s perfectly capable of doing by herself. Like jump off the dining room table.

    Although, really, she has a perfect landing, so I probably should encourage more jumping off furniture. And cars. And trees. And whatever else is high and guaranteed to cause heart palpitations.