Today's Features

  • “August: Osage County” has a cast full of A-list talent in a story of a family with a lot of problems. A lot may be an understatement.

    The family deals with suicide, drug addiction, alcoholism, infidelity, incest, pedophilia, abuse, neglect and lots and lots of anger. That might not be an exhaustive list, but it’s all I can remember.

    In short, it’s not a happy movie. It is described by many as a dark comedy, but the comedic moments are few and far between.

  • Sunday, Punxsutawney Phil will pop out of his groundhog hole and tell us if more winter is coming or if spring soon will be on its way. For the love of sanity, please, let it be spring.

    It’s probably not a stretch to say everyone’s had it with this winter. Mostly because of the bone-chilling cold.

    The county has been plagued with pipes bursting, furnace issues, school closings and frozen spots on the roads. In short, winter has not been a welcomed friend.

  • Best friends take the stage once again at Hardin County Playhouse for the fourth play in the Greater Tuna series, “Tuna Does Vegas.”

    Bo Cecil and Josh Logsdon each play about 12 different roles in the two-man comedy.

    The story involves Arles and Bertha, a couple featured in the three previous plays, who are heading to Las Vegas to renew their wedding vows on Valentine’s Day and residents of the town of Tuna decide to go with them, Cecil said.

    A play like this has challenges, but is fun for these two friends to do together.

  • Favorite film: "The Notebook"

    Favorite book: "Wuthering Heights"

    Favorite music/musician: country music, Luke Bryan

    Favorite track event: High jump


    Sydney Nall traces her desire to help others to her father, Richie.

    “He always puts others first,” Nall said.

  • For the third consecutive year, the Kentucky Soybean Association’s Top Recruiter Award went to Larry Thomas of Elizabethtown. Thomas was recognized during the 2014 Kentucky Commodity Conference recently held in Bowling Green.

    The Kentucky Soybean Association is a grassroots organization and its leaders are proud of the members they represent. Keeping a strong voice in Frankfort and in Washington D.C., is extremely important, but at the same time recruiting members often is one of the toughest jobs as a member of the board.


  • Marie Clifford said she really doesn’t know what all the fuss is about.

    “I did my job and raised my children, nothing really that special,” she said.

    But after surviving bombings of her village during World War II and spending 40 years in the food service industry, retiring from Stone Hearth in Elizabethtown last month, Clifford’s story is more unique than she might think.

    She was born in 1939 in France.

    “I am as old as the war,” she said.

  • The Woman’s Club of Elizabethtown’s annual spaghetti supper, held Jan. 16 at the Brown-Pusey House, was an overwhelming success. There also was a silent auction, which brought in a larger profit for this fundraising event.

    Atria Senior Living provided the complimentary spaghetti, salad and bread for the evening. Club members brought their favorite desserts

  • The Hardin County AM Rotary Club President Daniel Tabb welcomes Dr. Adam D. Lye with the Hardin Memorial Hospital Cancer Care Center to the Jan. 24 meeting of the club. Dr. Lye discussed the positive differences being made in the fight against cancer, as well as the future relocation of the HMH Cancer Care Center to Robinbrooke Boulevard.

  • Elizabethtown Rotary Club President Val Claycomb, left, welcomes special guest speaker Linda Funk, founding director of Warm Blessings, the local soup kitchen. Funk reported on the growing services provided by Warm Blessings and the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser. Some in the community have empty bowls; and some in the community strive to help fill those bowls.