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Today's Features

  • Sixteen-year-old Harry Smith is ready to tell a tale of war.

    But it’s not his story. It’s the story of Pvt. William Greathouse, a Kentucky militiaman who fought in the War of 1812.

    As a character with Kentucky Chautauqua, a historical program administered through the Kentucky Humanities Council, Smith provides a glimpse into the life of the young soldier. Smith will be the featured guest Monday when The Hardin County Historical Society holds its quarterly meeting in the Historic State Theater’s First Federal Gallery.

  • Barry Manilow’s Music Project hopes digging out and dusting off an old instrument is worth a couple tickets to see the singer in concert. 

    Bring a new or gently used musical instrument to The Louisville Palace box office in Louisville to receive two free tickets for Manilow’s July 27 concert. The instrument drop off is open between noon and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday or two hours prior to any show.

    With hits including “Mandy” and “Copacabana,” Barry Manilow’s career has spanned more than 40 years.

  • More than 90 people attended the Central Kentucky Tea Party meeting on July 3 to hear Minister Michael Johnson speak about the communications gap between different minority groups and how to improve the situation. Johnson mentors inner city teens with the hopes of inspiring them to finish school and create a positive future for themselves.

  • Throughout the year, Radcliff Woman’s Club honors veterans in numerous ways. In the fall items are collected and donated to the Veterans Administration Center and support is also given to projects affiliated with the veterans cemetery and other veterans memorials. In February, the club distributed Valentine cards specially created for the club to give to the veterans at North Hardin Health & Rehabilitation Center as a thank you for service to country.

  • The first day of the Hardin County Fair, July 9, opened with entries for the exhibits. The Lincoln Trail Area Master Gardeners were on hand for the vegetable and fruit entries with Amy Aldenderfer, horticulture agent, judging the winning entries. From left, Pat Stillwell, Valerie Hicks, Janet McDermott, Amy Aldenderfer, Norva Lark and Lisa Logsdon.

  • A simple no-bake cheesecake does not have to come out of a box.

    There are some easy cheesecake recipes that require few steps and ingredients that not only look great but taste great.

    A no-bake cheesecake with a chocolate chip cookie crust is one of those cheesecakes. Drool, if you wish, just from the description.

    The recipe calls for a crust that is basically a very large cookie. It suggests using your favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe but, since we are keeping it simple, use a tube of refrigerated cookie dough.

  • Something’s happening in children’s films that is hard to swallow.

    For some reason, filmmakers feel they need to make children’s films more adult-like to appeal to parents and make more money. The logic, in and of itself, is madness. Children can’t come to the movies on their own, so their parents are stuck watching the child’s pick. Therefore there is no need to make it more adult to lure parents. They already are there.

    So the logic is rubbish.

  • “Ice Age: Continental Drift” doesn’t have groundbreaking or artistic animation, but it is a film the entire family can watch together.

    The “Ice Age” gang is on their fourth adventure, and this time Manny is not only separated from his family, but he and his friends encounter pirates on the icy seas.

    Scrat the prehistoric squirrel inadvertently causes the great continental divide by chasing an acorn to the Earth’s core, spinning it and causing the plates to divide into continents.