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Today's Features

  • January is a month for new beginnings, a month full of promise as spring is just around a couple corners.

    Resolutions can be a fad or tradition of old, and many resolutions fade quickly. This year, you might want to start something new: yearlong warming thoughts. Here are some suggestions for each month of the New Year.

  • Bennie and Barbara Grissom would like to thank all the people who donated services, food and money to help with Christmas dinner in Elizabethtown. Without their help, this would not be possible. It was greatly appreciated.

    We also would like to thank The News-Enterprise and Leesa Mitchell at WAKY for the help in getting the word out to the community and The National Guard Armory for donating the use of the building.

    Volunteers included Doug and Louise Clark, Brandon Newton, Tina Voss, Johnnie Miller, James Clem, Chris Warp and Tommy Locke

  • Pat Clark and Hardin County AM Rotary President Daniel Tabb, left, welcome Sherry Murphy, executive director of Elizabethtown Tourism to the Dec. 13 meeting. Murphy spoke about the positive economic impact tourism has had to the community over the last year.

  • While the map shows 160 miles between Rowan County Senior High School and the community of Vine Grove, the two became much closer, thanks to the partnership between Vine Grove and Rowan County’s Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors.

  • The Fort Knox Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America held its monthly meeting Dec. 18 at the MOAA Clubhouse on Fort Knox.

    The guest speaker was Gilda Hill, executive director of the Office of Kentucky Veterans Centers as part of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs in Frankfort. She is responsible for the veteran’s cemeteries and the veteran’s centers or nursing homes.

  • It’s New Year’s Eve so you better get your black-eyed peas soaking.

    One New Year’s Day tradition includes black-eyed peas and cabbage. It is said the peas symbolize prosperity because they swell as they cook and the greens, in this case cabbage, symbolize money.

  • Mention the smells of Christmas and most people have little trouble ticking off their favorites: The perfume of evergreen, the citrusy smell of fruit in the Christmas stockings, cinnamon spice tea brewing, the aroma of gingerbread cookies and pumpkin bread baking.

    So popular are these smells that they’ve been packaged in Christmas aerosol sprays, candles and refresher oils.

    Not so with the New Year. 

  • Once upon a time there was a little girl who dreamed big dreams. She grew up on a farm in rural Kentucky but her dreams spread far across the stars.

    There were many things she dreamed of becoming and most of them were drawn from things she had seen in a film or read in a book. Oh, the dangers of reading a book, to believe in the impossible.

  • Crediting her work to a “servant’s heart,” Rebecca Farris Allen, executive director of Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties, believes there’s more to her role than just a job.

    “I feel it’s like an opportunity to be a missionary here at home,” Allen said.

    Several years ago, when her father-in-law was on a ventilator, Allen became aware of how important nurses were. She pursued that occupation and worked for a little more than 13 years at Hardin Memorial Hospital.