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Today's Features

  • Ancestral Trails Historical Society members met for the March meeting at the public library in Elizabethtown. Guest speaker was Ron Elliott, who spoke on the life of Franklin Sousley, who was born in Hilltop. Sousley was one of the Marines who helped raise the flag at Iwo Jima in World War II. Sousley was killed a month later. The famous photo of him and other men raising the flag was taken by Joe Rosenthal. Elliott wrote a book on the life of Sousley titled “From Hilltop to Mountaintop.”

  • FOR MORE INFORMATION: To learn more about the lampwork glass beads made by Vine Grove resident Denise Lemke, visit caravancreations.net.

    Near an open flame in the kitchen of her Vine Grove residence, Denise Lemke held a stick-like implement known as a mandrel in one hand and a glass rod in the other.

    She drew the rod to the fire provided by an oxygen propane torch until the glass melted and carefully wrapped the material onto the mandrel, which she twirled.

    “This is a hobby you have to be very patient with,” Lemke said.

  • I’m a bit of a sci-fi bug. It’s not something I realized about myself until recently, as in the last couple years or so.

    I mean, you’d think it would have been obvious, but I believe I spent too much of my life trying to pretend I was much cooler than I actually am.

  • A few years ago, when the St. Vincent de Paul Society in Elizabethtown did not have a thrift store, Judy Banks suggested one be established.

    It was in the fall of 2011 when Banks, who has volunteered for the organization for more than six years, said she told organization members she hoped her proposal would be turned down.

    “Of course, they wanted to do this,” Banks said.

    Fundraising began with appeals for donations of $1,000. Banks wanted to model the Elizabethtown thrift store after an upscale one she had seen.

  • I admit it. I’m one of those tree huggers who recycles. You know, the ones who chirp they reuse junk mail envelopes to write their grocery lists on so they can tuck their coupons inside.

    Well, I don’t exactly do that, but I often feel I’m on a mission to keep things out of the landfill.

    Take office paper, for instance. If one side has printing on it, there are 93.5 perfectly good square inches of space on the other side that can be used for handouts, schedules, lists of classes and the like.

  • Susan Figg has taken care of Elizabethtown’s children for 45 years.

    Over those decades, Figg has worked in preschool, daycare, church nurseries and private child care.

    But that wasn’t her original goal.

    After high school she went to business college in Louisville and did modeling work on the side. Her intention was to work in business administration.

    Her husband, Daryl, joined the U.S. Air Force and the couple was stationed in England for four years.

  • The Woman’s Club of Elizabethtown met March 7 at the Brown Pusey House with club President Betty Sue French, presiding.

    St. Patrick’s Day decorations and food were served by hostesses Phyllis Shumate, JoAnn Winkenhofer and Becky Bishop.

    Bobbie Dille introduced Wren Smith of Bernheim Forest who gave the program “Unlock the Mysteries of Hummingbirds” which was received with much interest.

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  • Books are exciting, wonderful and brilliant and can be the inspiration for cooking.

    Library Media Specialist Jessica Hundley decided to combine books and food as a reward to some of her avid readers at Bluegrass Middle School. They gathered in the media center last week during the school’s Read Across America emphasis. The event was rescheduled because of snow the week before.

  • The term “lasagna” comes from the Greek word, “lasagnum,” meaning dish or bowl. The ancient Greeks used baking dishes of that name, which they eventually transferred to the Romans.

    The Romans, who ended up using the same style of dish, also developed a type of food which they used the term “lasagnum” for: it was served in said dish, with layers of a pasta-like food and other fillings in-between. With the extent of the Roman Empire, this new “lasagnum” dish spread all across Europe.