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Today's Features

  • The plastic snap-together vehicle — no bigger than a lunchbox — rolls forward, backing up and turning left slightly more than 90 degrees after it hits a barrier.

    “The backup’s fine now,” Ricardo Croft, youth lab technician and youth program assistant, tells a student. “The rotation needs to be a little less.”

  • The highlight of the July meeting of the Lincoln Trail Area Master Gardeners Association was guest speaker Margaret Shea. Shea is the owner of The Dropseed Native Plant Nursery in Oldham County. Shea gave a presentation on the benefits of using native plants in our gardens.

    After Shea’s presentation everyone was treated to homemade ice cream sundaes.

  • Like many who visit the Gulf Coast of Alabama, my family not only hits the beach, but also takes an eating tour of the region’s unique restaurants.

    Some are larger, touristy places and others are out-of-the-way nooks discovered by accident or on the advice of locals who haunt there.

    Sometimes these places can inspire you to try to figure out recipes once you get home. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.

  • A groundhog, what some call a woodchuck or whistle pig, has been wreaking havoc in our yard and life this summer.

    I was first alerted to his presence when Mom pointed out something had been chewing on pots of parsley and dill by her door. Our son, Joel, had brought her and me the herbal gifts for Mother’s Day.

    Rabbits already had gotten into the garden and nibbled the tops of the first planting of green beans, as they did every summer, so I supposed they had become a little bolder.

  • It’s that time of year again. Back to school for the kiddos and to the local bank for a loan for parents who buy all these school supplies.

    I looked at a list for a couple fourth-graders and a sixth-grader. Can you say ridiculous? I know it has been more than 20 years since my oldest child started school, but today’s cost to get a child back to school is too high.

  • At the July 9 meeting of the Radcliff Woman’s Club, guest speaker Felicia Toliver, of Elizabethtown Community and Technical College talked about diversity. She said diversity is not limited to race, ethniciy, sexual orientation, gender, religion, color, national origin, age, ancestry or creed. Diversity, she said, “as a concept, describes an inclusive community of people with varied human characteristics, ideas and world views.”

  • The many, very talented citizens of Hardin County just provided another successful Hardin County Fair with their many beautiful entries in the family living section. The building was filled with a wonderful display of 944 entries in many different categories.

  • Paris, London, Oxford and Normandy became extensions of the classroom for four girls who attend Valley Creek Baptist Church in Elizabethtown.

    For the third year, the girls participated in Student Leadership University, a faith-based leadership program that offers experiences around the globe at four levels. The girls participated in SLU 101, for which they travelled to Orlando, Fla., and SLU 201, which took them to Washington, D.C.

  • Today’s “One of Hardin County’s Finest Cooks” and his family are some of the recent newcomers to Hardin County. Dr. John Cole joined the practice of my neurosurgeon, Dr. Thad Jackson, and from what I hear from “Dr. J” and some of the nurses, Dr. Cole is quite the cook — to be exact, a gourmet cook.

    Cole is a self-taught cook inspired by his mother, father and grandmother. His mom and mama (grandmother) are from Casey County so simple home cooking was the rule.