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Today's Features

  • Growing up in the action-heavy era of the 1980s and 1990s, it’s hard to picture how a remake of “Total Recall” would work without Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Sure, Schwarzenegger isn’t the greatest actor in the world, but he was a larger-than-life personality in that film.

    The current remake with Colin Farrell (“Fright Night”) might have kept a few visuals and references to the original film but felt less than blockbuster.

  • A few weekends ago I found myself driving to Louisville on a Friday night. My friend Laura had invited me to help write the script for a short film for the 48-Hour Film Project.

    The crux of this competition is that filmmakers meet at a certain time and place on Friday night, randomly draw a genre, receive certain elements required to be in the film and have 48 hours to produce a work.

  • Wayne H. Hayes, left, was recognized by Glendale Lions Club president James Jeffries at the Aug. 2 meeting. Hayes is a charter member of the Glendale Lions Club, which was chartered in January, 1947.

  • The plastic snap-together vehicle — no bigger than a lunchbox — rolls forward, backing up and turning left slightly more than 90 degrees after it hits a barrier.

    “The backup’s fine now,” Ricardo Croft, youth lab technician and youth program assistant, tells a student. “The rotation needs to be a little less.”

  • The highlight of the July meeting of the Lincoln Trail Area Master Gardeners Association was guest speaker Margaret Shea. Shea is the owner of The Dropseed Native Plant Nursery in Oldham County. Shea gave a presentation on the benefits of using native plants in our gardens.

    After Shea’s presentation everyone was treated to homemade ice cream sundaes.

  • Like many who visit the Gulf Coast of Alabama, my family not only hits the beach, but also takes an eating tour of the region’s unique restaurants.

    Some are larger, touristy places and others are out-of-the-way nooks discovered by accident or on the advice of locals who haunt there.

    Sometimes these places can inspire you to try to figure out recipes once you get home. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.

  • A groundhog, what some call a woodchuck or whistle pig, has been wreaking havoc in our yard and life this summer.

    I was first alerted to his presence when Mom pointed out something had been chewing on pots of parsley and dill by her door. Our son, Joel, had brought her and me the herbal gifts for Mother’s Day.

    Rabbits already had gotten into the garden and nibbled the tops of the first planting of green beans, as they did every summer, so I supposed they had become a little bolder.

  • It’s that time of year again. Back to school for the kiddos and to the local bank for a loan for parents who buy all these school supplies.

    I looked at a list for a couple fourth-graders and a sixth-grader. Can you say ridiculous? I know it has been more than 20 years since my oldest child started school, but today’s cost to get a child back to school is too high.

  • At the July 9 meeting of the Radcliff Woman’s Club, guest speaker Felicia Toliver, of Elizabethtown Community and Technical College talked about diversity. She said diversity is not limited to race, ethniciy, sexual orientation, gender, religion, color, national origin, age, ancestry or creed. Diversity, she said, “as a concept, describes an inclusive community of people with varied human characteristics, ideas and world views.”