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Today's Features

  • John Thompsett of Izzy’s Little Creepers presents a check for $355 to Linda Funk, executive director of Warm Blessings. The money was raised in a silent auction held during the Night Risers Film Festival and Zombie Fest at Pritchard Community center in September. Thompsett’s Izzy’s Little Creepers Haunted Attractions and Events Co., who created Elizabethtown Zombie Fest last year, created Night Risers Film Festival and Zombie Fest.

  • Michael Bentley, with Boy Scout Troop 24 of Elizabethtown, recently completed his Eagle Scout Project at Saunders Springs.

    Adrian Bambini, Eagle Scout Project coordinator at Saunders Springs, met with Bentley a few times in advance of the project to coordinate efforts to make sure things went smoothly on the day of work.

  • Music has long been an outlet for Lander Ryan, and he works weekly to give the ability of artistic expression to others.

    An Elizabethtown High School junior, Ryan recently was awarded a Kohl’s Cares award based on his volunteer hours around the community, specifically at Panther Place, an after-school care program in Elizabethtown Independent Schools.

  • Woman’s Club of Elizabethtown members, Martha Burn, Phyllis Brandenburg, Ann Gardner, Jo Griffith, Diane Willis, Rose Carter, Cora Ellen McKinley, Judy Banks, Joyce Sorrell, Jean Davis, Regina Lancaster, Bobbie Dille, Delta Fulks, Tuula Poikonen and Rosemary Deaton, contributed to the Alzheimer’s research program.

  • More than 600 kids in Hardin County are at-risk of not always having enough food at home over the weekends when school meals are not available. Feeding America, Kentucky’s Heartland provides weekend BackPacks, bags filled with nutritious foods, to get these at-risk kids through the weekend.

    While FAKH has funding to provide BackPacks for the majority of these at-risk children, it still has about 100 BackPackers who need to be adopted in Hardin County.

  • Face it. People who have kids and neat and tidy houses have issues.

    Yep, I said it. Maybe that’s what I tell myself so I can sleep at night. But you know what? It works.

    I don’t take a white glove into my children’s room — or around my house. However, I am amazed by several things when I open the door.

    1. How anyone walks through what looks like a war zone without getting lost or sucked in.

    2. How they stand the smell.

  • There is no doubt Justin Pawley loves Central Hardin High School athletics. Pawley, who has Down syndrome, has been involved with Central Hardin sports since he was a team manger in high school and became an honorary coach after graduating in 1999.

    He’s been with the boys' soccer team for 20 years and the boys' basketball team for 18.

    “All I ever wanted to do is coach,” Pawley said.

    Soccer coach Mike Wiersema said his pregame talks are legendary.

  • For five generations of one family, going to work simply means going Back Home.

    Back Home Restaurant has a long history of family members — men, women, boys and girls — chipping in to make the business successful. But family members trace the beginning and the future to women.

    “We’ve had a lot of help ... but it’s mostly women who keep it rolling,” said Linda Fulkerson, the restaurant’s owner.

    “We’re the backbone,” Fulkerson’s granddaughter, Hali Spiers, said.

  • I’ve been thinking a lot recently about my daughter and her endless argumentativeness, and how 3 years old has to be the toughest age imaginable.

  • The day of Oct. 7 is always a battle in my mind and in my heart. I dread that day each year.

    It's nothing close to the torment that my father must surely feel as he emotionally is pulled in two extreme directions. The day is his birth date and the anniversary of his wife's death.