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Today's Features

  • In his workshop behind his house in Eastview, Gene Baskett is just as likely to be holding mammoth ivory as he is steel.

    For the last 32 years, Baskett has been making custom knives, a craft rooted in an interest that can be traced back many years.

    “Boys like knives,” he explained.

    Baskett, owner of Baskett Custom Knives, joined The Knifemaker’s Guild in 1981 — a year after he started making custom knives — and now sits on the board of directors for the organization.

  • A free concert honoring members of the military and their families is Sunday at the corner of Vine Street and Woodland Drive in Radcliff.

    Unlimited, Peacemakers, Salsa Rhythms and Come Together Band perform at the event from 3 to 6:30 p.m.

    The bands’ musical genres include gospel, salsa, R&B and jazz.

    While the concert is free and open to the public, donations are accepted. Proceeds benefit Dollars for Dukes and the American Red Cross, sponsor Jeff Kennedy said.

  • The following property transfers are listed as given on deeds at the Hardin County Clerk’s Office in Elizabethtown.

    Nancy Overall to David Hunt Overall, property in Hardin County, love and affection. FMV: $2,600.

    Nancy Overall to Mary Gay Young, property in Hardin County, love and affection. FMV: $2,600.

    Barbara A. Chumley to Paul L. and Amy D. Huff, 103 White Oak Drive, Elizabethtown, $380,000.

    The Estate of Nellie M. Woodring to Trevor and Amanda Ritchie, 1580 Bethlehem Academy Road, Cecilia, $78,950.

  • If the names Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia are familiar favorites, you’re in for some killer entertainment Saturday night at the Historic State Theater.

    “The Golden Girls” Murder Mystery Dinner starts at 7 p.m. in the First Federal Gallery Banquet Room.

    Actors from Lexington group Fantastical Theatricals portray television’s comedic quartet, and audience members have an opportunity to interact with them as a murder mystery unfolds.

  • Lined up by my kitchen sink are the cut-off bases of half-gallon milk cartons filled with rich black soil. In each is a wooden Popsicle stick marked with a black Sharpie: tomato, basil, cilantro.

    The counter is a temporary home. When tiny green tendrils poke up through the dirt, the carton is moved to a shelf in a south-facing window in my mom’s apartment.

    I don’t remember when I last grew garden plants from seed. Many years ago I deemed it too much trouble and instead bought the peppers, tomatoes and herbs I plant in May from an area garden store.

  • On the southern side of Kenton County, there’s a little community called Piner. There’s an elementary school, a corner market, some churches and not much else but homes and farms.

    Every time I drive through Stephensburg, I think about Piner. I think about my grandma, Mary Ruth, and everyone in Piner.

    Piner was devastated when tornadoes ripped through the region March 3. A volunteer coordinator estimated 100 homes were destroyed and another 250 families were affected. Four people died.

  • I have to begin this review with a confession. I didn’t realize Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote anything beyond his work with Tarzan. But through the introduction of Disney’s “John Carter” I learned Burroughs wrote a work that inspired much of modern science fiction.

  • Michelle West, a representative of Lowe’s Home Improvement Center in Elizabethtown, was the guest speaker at the March 6 meeting of the Elizabethtown Lions Club. She spoke on behalf of the Muscular Dystrophy Association, seeking the club’s support of their fundraising drive. She mentioned many ways in which funds help children and adults stricken by the debilitating diseases that fall under the umbrella of muscular dystrophy, and the importance of seeking cures through research.

  • Recently the 2012 Hardin County Young Farmers State winners were announced. 2012 Kentucky Young Farmer Member of the Year is Kerby Grey; Ag. Mechanics Proficiency Contest, Drew Langley, third place; Farm Management Contest, Josh Seagraves, first place and Nathan Highbaugh, tied for second place; Rural Leadership Award, Mark Thomas, second place; Wheat Production, Patrick Preston, first place; White Corn Production, Phillip Rogers, first place; and Diversified Crop Production, Mark Thomas, second place.

  • More than 18 brave individuals took part in the first Penguin Plunge to help provide Hardin County students with Junior Achievement’s financial literacy programs. The event raised more than $9,114.

    Teams and individuals took a plunge for the Penguin Plunge on March 3 at the Bluegrass Cellular headquarters in Elizabethtown.

    In 2011-12, Junior Achievement of Kentuckiana will serve more than 1,000 students in Hardin County.