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Wednesday's Woman

  • Got to be Real: Reflecting on black history

    As Black History Month gets under way, I can only think of what my foremothers and fathers thought as they were being transferred to this country in shackles and chains, being tossed about by the high seas, leaving a homeland, some as kings and queens, to a life of leather whips, dogs and being belittled on every hand.

    I wonder what they thought about as they were paraded onto the slavery block, and their man and womanhood was exposed to the highest bidder, treated no better than horses and cows at a livestock auction.

  • Educator embraces role as 'seed planter'

    Brenda Tucker believes in education.

    Whether as part of her career as an educator that has spanned some three decades or as one of the caretakers of the Emma Reno Connor Black History Gallery in Elizabethtown, knowledge is important to Tucker.

    For about 30 years, the Radcliff resident has been in the education field, but she doesn’t call her profession a job because she enjoys it so much.

  • Hamlin jumped into her life's passion

    To say Kelly Hamlin hopped into the passion of her life is an understatement.

    Though her day job is in marketing and sales at 94.3 The Wolf in Elizabethtown, Wednesday nights and various other times during the week she coaches the Jumping Knights at St. James Catholic Regional School.

    Her interest began about seven years ago when she saw the Jumping Hawks of LaRue County. Her daughter Kayleigh, then 6, was enamored by them, she said.

  • Speakers with Spark: Grateful for President Roosevelt

    This month we will celebrate Presidents’ Day. This past summer I started to think about how someone in the office of president can affect generations to come as I was visiting a national park. Our country truly is America, the beautiful.

    There are so many national parks to visit that are awesome and fun for the entire family. What if someone did not see the need or have the vision 100 years ago to preserve these beautiful areas of our country? They could have fallen into private hands and the public would not have privilege to see these gorgeous sites.

  • Riding for a cause: Fort Knox soldier committed to raising awareness of domestic abuse

    Staff Sgt. Eugenia Angibeau, an active guard reservist, knows first-hand about the devastating effects of domestic violence, and she wants to make sure others know, too.

    “I’m a survivor of domestic abuse,” said Angibeau, 39, a Fort Knox resident. She is attached to the 354th Chemical Company in Louisville.

    Though she vowed at a young age never to be in a relationship that involved domestic abuse, she found herself in just that situation.

    “I’ve been in domestic shelters, homeless shelters,” Angibeau said.

  • Motherhood and More: For those suffering a loss

    Recently, a girl from Meade County died in a car wreck. She was 27, a young mother of a little boy.

    I recently got to know her, though I don’t claim to know her well. Not like her many, many friends. Not like my new sister-in-law. You see, this girl, Sarah Hottell, and I were both bridesmaids in my husband’s brother’s wedding in December.

  • Compassion drives rewarding career

    Leslie Hall found the career she loved after her husband was assigned to Fort Knox. It’s a career that has led to an appointment to a state board.

    After completing a degree in psychology and biblical studies at Tennessee Temple University, Hall participated in an internship at the child abuse council in Georgia and found she enjoyed the social work aspect of what she did.

  • Life or Something Like It: Hang around, holidays

    My husband’s sister usually takes her Christmas tree down Dec. 26.

    When Christmas is over, it’s over, she says. Besides, the tree takes up space in her living room.

    Others I know devote New Year’s Day to packing up the decorations, a family project.

    Still others leave them up until Jan. 6, Three Kings Day, the 12th of the 12 days of Christmas.

    Me, I’m a Christmas extender.

    I’m not in a hurry to pack away the nutcrackers, the lights and the nativity scene.

  • Got to be Real: Holding tight to who you are

    By Shonna Sheckles

    Have you ever thought about what others might think of you? Do they think you might be too fat, too thin, too fair, too dark? In the large scheme of things, does what others think about you really matter?

  • Akers uses position at library to form lasting connections

    Rebekah Akers, 36, bound her love of books and her passion for community into her position as Adult and Public Services Librarian at the Hardin County Public Library.

    She always has loved libraries and some of her earliest memories include spending time in the college library near her childhood home in Berea.

    “I can still remember how it smells,” she said.