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Wednesday's Woman

  • Girls just want to have fun ... with vampires

    Millions have flocked to the films in the “Twilight” saga. Many are teenage girls who are in love with the young male stars. But there is a segment of the 30 and older crowd as fanatic about the films as teens. But for them it’s more about getting together and having a good time.

    The “Twi-hards” attended a midnight screening of the “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part I” with more than 500 others in Hardin County and had a special party, a wedding shower, celebrating the two main characters, Bella and Edward.

  • World-traveling sisters become Elizabethtown residents, co-owners of landmark eatery

    Still in their 20s, Sofia and Martina Abubakr have traveled the world and now find themselves in Elizabethtown where they plan to put down roots while running a local deli.

    “I’m insanely jealous of people who say, ‘I’ve known her since kindergarten,’” Sofia, 24, said.

    Growing up, she and her family moved about every two years. Travels throughout the years include the Philippines, Germany and Korea.

  • 'Breaking Dawn' trivia answers

    1. Charlie

    2. Feathers

    3. Rosalie

    4. Rachel

    5. Edward Jacob (or Ejay)

    6. Renesmee

    7. Nessie

    8. Isle Esme

    9. Seth

    10. Mercedes

    11. Near death experience

    12. Sam

    13. Edward

    14. Jacob

    15. Necklace

    16. Eggs

  • No sparkle for 'Breaking Dawn'

    At the risk of having my house egged for saying it, “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” isn’t much of an improvement from its predecessors.

    Even “Twilight” fans would agree, they don’t go to the films for the acting or the quality of film. They go to see the characters they’ve grown attached to from the books and previous films.

  • Family, food and fellowship: The life of Susan Keith

    Entertaining and cooking for the ones she loves is at the core of Susan Keith’s life.

    During a weekly family lunch, places at the table are set before everyone arrives. Food is prepared buffet-style. Glasses are refilled by the host and hostess and dessert is served with coffee.

    It’s all about family. Keith, 77, used to fix lunch more than once a week but after a fall and use of a walker, she’s narrowed her cooking a bit. She often makes lunch for people outside the family as well.

  • Life or Something Like It: Don’t gloss over the joys of Thanksgiving

    You gotta feel sorry for Thanksgiving.

    Sandwiched between Halloween and Christmas, it’s not a very glitzy holiday. At least not in comparison to its counterparts the month before and the month after November.

  • Tami Delaney works to feed soul and body

    Tami Delaney helps nourish the soul and body.

    Through a Louisville church group she provides prison ministry at a women’s correctional center; as development director for Feeding America Kentucky’s Heartland, she helps feed the needy.

    “I feel that everybody in the world was put here for a purpose,” Delaney said.

    The Elizabethtown native said she couldn’t see sitting around while there was a “whole vast world of need” beyond her own.

  • Got to be Real: Thrift shopping lets you be a diva on a dime

    By SHONNA SHECKLES

    I have been dressing up ever since I can remember.

    I think my mother is the cause of me loving clothes the way I do. It all started with the Bo-Peep Shoppe, Spalding’s and Dobbs Family Shoe Store in Bardstown. I would walk by their windows every day after school and admire all the outfits on display. I was a pretty-plus child, so all my clothes were expensive because of my size. As time went on and I was able to buy my own clothes, I would get fashion ideas from magazines, TV and just watching people.

  • Tina Decker puts her prayers to action

    In 2003, illness began to take over Tina Decker’s family and their finances. At the moment when she felt her walls crumbling, she fell to her knees in submission to God. Not only did help arrive, but the Putting Prayers to Action ministry was born.

    Her family found themselves in an unfamiliar place. They were a two-income family that had saved for the future. Then her oldest son, Trace, became ill. He had a kidney disorder and endured 11 surgeries and multiple procedures.

  • Speakers with Spark: Parents' messages should be crafted to children's learning styles

    I had the privilege of hearing Pam Stenzel, an international abstinence speaker, give an analogy about how God would feel if we made bad choices.