.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Wednesday's Woman

  • The Women behind Wednesday's Women

    Sunday is Mother’s Day, an opportunity to take time to let moms know how much they are appreciated. Many of the women featured in Wednesday’s Woman speak very highly of their moms, often calling them mentors or giving them some credit for their success.

    In honor of Mother’s Day, some of these women shared the reasons why their moms are so important in their lives — the woman behind the woman, so to speak.

  • Speakers with Spark: Good things start with self-respect

    By Sheila O’Mara

    Have you heard? There is a growing epidemic sweeping our nation. It is claiming the well-being of thousands of people and is changing the shape of our society. It is altering lives and not necessarily for the better. What is the cause of this growing epidemic?  That would be an overabundant lack of self-respect.

  • The List: Mother's Day flowers

    If you’re a mother, there’s a good chance your near future is flowering. And if you have a mother, pondering a plant purchase is probable. Flowers and plants are undeniably popular Mother’s Day gifts — fitting, as flowers are plain pretty and, with love and care, keep growing. Here are a few interesting facts about Mother’s Day flowers from the Society of American Florists.

  • Festival showcase art, crafts by women

    The third annual Every Woman’s Arts and Crafts Spring Festival will showcase creations from fine art, jewelry and pottery to handmade soaps and candles from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Colvin Community Center in Radcliff. About 35 artists and crafters will be on hand.

  • A Notable Life: Mamapreneur Joanna Black shares her passion for music

    Faith, family, music and children are key components of Joanna Black’s life.

    As the mother of a 4-year-old girl, Kindermusik instructor, cello teacher and supervisor of developmental book sales, among other things, Joanna is a mamapreneur who has found a way to incorporate the things she loves into her work.

    “I come from a musical family,” Joanna said. “My dad was a traditional vocalist.”

  • Have babies, will travel ... if you’ll have us

    Coordination has never been my strong suit. If a couch is near, I’ll stub my toe on it. If a table is there, my thigh will find a corner. Door frames leap out and ram into my shoulders and hands as I walk through. I’ve hit my head on so many cabinets it’s a wonder I don’t have a permanent knot on top of my noggin. I am continually covered in bruises from an indeterminate origin, just because I run into things so often I forget which bruise went with which piece of furniture.

  • Diabetes sufferers should protect their eyesight

    By Mechelle Coble

    All people with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, are at risk for developing diabetic eye disease. Diabetic eye diseases include diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma. All can cause severe vision loss and even blindness, but early detection and treatment can help prevent further damage and future vision loss.

  • The List: Helping military families

    Many in the community give generously to support deployed soldiers, collecting supplies and goodies to mail overseas. But the families on the home front need support, too. Michelle Cuthrall, a writer, mother and military wife who has been through deployments, offers the following suggestions. For a more detailed list, check out her website, www.behindthebluestarbanner.com.

  • Banquet bolsters the mother-daughter bond

    It’s all about mothers, daughters and their special bonds.

    The third annual Mother and Daughter Banquet, themed “A Mother’s Love,” will celebrate and nurture the mother-daughter relationship, said Gail Phoenix of GMP Services, a Vine Grove training and consulting firm that advocates for woman and children. GMP Services is hosting the event.

    The event is from noon to 3 p.m. May 7 at Colvin Community Center in Radcliff.

  • Life or Something Like It: Crash landings and other unintended consequences

    So one minute you’re tooling along on the highway of life and the next minute someone stops short in front of you.

    An accident certainly changes all your plans.

    But then again, if you could plan for it, it wouldn’t be an accident.

    I was driving my mom back from her winter home in Florida at the end of March. In late afternoon on a two-lane road in Georgia, I realized I wasn’t going to be able to stop in time to avoid plowing into the pickup truck in front of me.