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Wednesday's Woman

  • Army wife, mother, author, speaker, businesswoman and runner

    Some stay-at-home mothers have found ways to nurture careers from the home, too. Often inspired by their role as mother, homemaker or wife, these creative women are channeling their skills to build businesses, craft products and help others. In April, Wednesday's Woman is taking a look at some of the area's mamapreneurs.

     

  • New opportunities await women in transition

    The News-Enterprise

    The New Opportunity School for Women is accepting applications for its summer residential program in Berea. The program aims to improve women's lives by building self-esteem and teaching skills including computer basics, job searching and leadership.

    During the free program, set for June 5-25, women will attend classes, complete internships and participate in cultural activities, said Debbie King, of NOSW. They will also have access to health screenings.

  • Motherhood and more

    I am a stay-at-home mom. It still seems strange to say that. I honestly haven’t had too much time to reflect on it, what with the two children constantly hanging off of me. But the transition cannot be called a smooth one. I look at other moms who stay home, and most of them seem to have everything under control. I've felt like a failure on more than one occasion. Heck, just my 6-month-old daughter refusing to take a morning nap can bring me to my knees on the right – or wrong – day.

  • Carol Zagar's life of movement

    Carol Zagar’s life is all about movement. Among other roles, Zagar is a dance instructor, choreographer and physical therapist.

    “I started dance when I was 5,” Zagar recalled.

    At the time, her family was living in a suburb of Cincinnati.

    When the PTA of her school brought in dance teacher Jack Louiso to provide instruction after school, Zagar’s parents agreed to allow her and her two siblings to take lessons, she said.

    “That was an activity that they could afford all three of us (to) do,” she said.

  • Pure passion a key to performance

    The passion of performance is the foundation of the brilliantly disturbing Oscar award winning film, “Black Swan.” Natalie Portman performs as the lead ballerina in the performance of “Swan Lake,” which examines the dark side of perfection in the context of high level performance.

  • Betty Hughes-Gillespie, nearly five decades of style

    For 44 years, Betty Hughes-Gillespie, has served her community and the clients of Coiffures by Betty Hughes, a salon on North Wilson Road.

    In December, Hughes-Gillespie retired after almost 50 years as a hairdresser. 

    She’s originally from Metcalfe County and knew she wanted to be a hairdresser since she was a little girl. She would sit on her dad’s knees and work on his hair. He would always tell her she was going to be a teacher, but she was determined to be a hairdresser.

  • Get outside, 'chik'

    Barren River Lake State Resort Park is hosting “Chiks in the Stiks” weekend March 18-20 for women who want to know more about the great outdoors.

    There will be lessons on fishing, archery, fire building, complete with s’mores, hiking, and even a golf clinic with the park’s PGA professional, Carmello Benassi, according to a news release.

    Organizers tout the weekend of activities as a great opportunity for a girlfriend outing.

  • Watching a friend's final transition

    As a pastor’s wife for almost 30 years, I’ve attended my share of weddings, funerals and baptisms and have accompanied my husband on hundreds of hospital and home visits.

    Not that I’m complaining. For the most part, that time with him is a joy as we serve together, united in a goal that’s greater than either of us.

  • Ask the expert: Home organization

    What if you could ask me a question about my experience as an organizer that has nothing to do with how to get organized, but has everything to do with the clients I have helped. Could you think of a question? I think you could because it happens to me all the time. When I first started my business my family and friends asked me vague questions such as, “How’s your business going?”

  • Art teacher's compassion helps troubled youth

    “I like teenagers. I’m weird that way,” Sheryl Lett Chapman said.

    She not only works with a group of 11th- and 12th-grade girls at Memorial United Methodist Church, where her husband is pastor, but also at the Lincoln Village Youth Development Center. 

    The latter is her passion.

    Someone at her church who mentors at Lincoln Village asked if Chapman would be interested in mentoring. Chapman admitted mentoring wasn’t her thing but she had volunteered as an art teacher in various places.