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Wednesday's Woman

  • Food feeds social growth

    Farming is a foundation for what Pem Buck teaches in her anthropology class at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College.

    Though her class is not specifically about farming, Buck said, anthropology is about understanding how social structures work. Producing food is one of the basic foundations for that, so how a society organizes itself to produce food is important to the subject.

    Producing food is among Buck’s personal background as is experiencing other cultures.

  • McQueary leads 'evolving' homemakers

    After teaching at G.C. Burkhead Elementary School for 28 years, Debbie McQueary retired in 2005 and joined a homemakers club. This involvement led her to be inducted as the current Hardin County Homemakers president.

    “Debbie is one of the nicest, most genuine and talented people I have ever met,” Hardin County Extension agent Teran Ransom said. “Her attention to detail and sense of community will enable her to make a great (president).”

  • Riggs reaps rewards from canning, floral arranging

    At 82, Agnes Riggs of Upton has a can-do attitude when it comes to her hobby: canning.

    Her efforts earned numerous accolades at the Kentucky State Fair, including a canning sweepstakes win. Additionally, Riggs placed in 16 categories ranging from plum preserves to red tomatoes.

    “I can anything there is to can,” she said as she worked in her kitchen among dozens of empty jars and many more filled with pickles, tomatoes and soup.

    A pressure canner has stayed on her stove all summer, she said.

  • Speakers with Spark: Words can hurt or heal

    Words spoken with kindness can change a life just as words spoken with harmful intent can affect a person for a lifetime.

    Being a people watcher, it always is interesting to watch and listen at airports, malls or social gatherings. It is quite amazing to hear what people say. Sometimes words are hurtful, disrespectful and downright mean. People insert their thoughts and feelings occasionally without filters.

  • Motherhood and More: Guiding siblings to friendship

    When I was younger and thought about having multiple children, I pictured them as the best of friends. They would play ball or dolls together, or maybe build intricate Lego houses complete with stairs and rooftop gardens. They would always talk kindly to each other and think of ways to make the other one’s day better.

    Reality, of course, rarely follows that sort of idealistic daydream. It’s usually much louder and more disagreeable than I ever could have imagined.

  • Life or Something Like It: Recreating family vacation

    On Thursday, we’re taking a trip back in time.

    We’ll take our middle son with us, pick up our youngest in Lexington and head for Franklin, N.C., where my husband’s family has a small vacation home on a gravel road near the top of Meadow Mountain. Our oldest son and his wife will join us Friday, driving in from Charleston, S.C.

  • Haiti mission trips among work for volunteer

    Lois Shinkle’s resolve to help others is stronger than the emotions that overwhelmed her the first time a baby died in her arms.

    It’s stronger than the intensity of heartache she felt seeing lifeless infants dressed in white smocks with red crosses on them who were placed in cardboard boxes because coffins weren’t available.

  • Parents go back to class, too

    Each August, students aren’t the only ones who head back to school. Shopping, homework and volunteering are how some moms go back to school, too.

    Jodie Thompson is back to her work as the Parent Teacher Fellowship president at Elizabethtown Christian Academy. It is her second year in that role.

    When Thompson isn’t at her job, she’s usually at her daughter Grace’s school.

    Because she loves the school so much, she said, volunteering “just made sense.”

  • Got to be Real: Manners, please

    By SHONNA SHECKLES

    I don’t know what has happened to manners in today’s society. Some people are so rude. I know we all have busy lives and sometimes unpleasant things happen to all of us. But you know what I called that? Life.

  • Speakers with Spark: The art of dealing with difficult people

    You can be a very positive, upbeat person, but let’s face it. In life you have to deal with difficult people.

    There might be difficult people at your church, school, family, friends or workplace. In most situations, you can choose to avoid these people. But in the workplace, you sometimes are forced to work with the most challenging of personalities. As a life coach, this is a very popular topic and many ask me to help them cope and turn this negative to a positive.