.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Is late planting a bad thing?

    As we continue into spring, it’s obvious farm work and seasonal progression of most crops are well behind average. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, as of April 22, only 15 percent of the corn crop in Kentucky had been planted, compared to 73 percent the same time last year, and a five-year average of 32 percent. Winter wheat is progressing slowly, as only 3 percent of the crop statewide has headed out, compared to 77 percent last year, and a five-year average of 19 percent.

  • Is late planting a bad thing?

    As we continue into spring, it’s obvious farm work and seasonal progression of most crops are well behind average. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, as of April 22, only 15 percent of the corn crop in Kentucky had been planted, compared to 73 percent the same time last year, and a five-year average of 32 percent. Winter wheat is progressing slowly, as only 3 percent of the crop statewide has headed out, compared to 77 percent last year, and a five-year average of 19 percent.

  • Retail, restaurant center desired in downtown

    Heath Seymour said the desire exists for a mixed-use facility in downtown Elizabethtown, providing restaurants and shopping residents who live in the area could walk to.

    City and Heritage Council officials gleaned the information during an informal poll at a quarterly downtown design meeting, in which participants were asked what they would like to see the former Herb Jones Chevrolet property developed into.

  • New subdivision will be eco-friendly

    The Magnolia Farms housing development off the new Patriot Parkway promises 50 large lots and homes featuring the latest ecologically friendly features.

  • Evening pasture improvement tour set

    Wondering what that new weed is in your pasture? Heard about smartgrass, but you did not know grasses went to school? Well then, we’ve got an educational activity for you. Mark Monday, May 6, on your calendar and plan to head to Rineyville for some answers.

    Paul Crutcher is hosting an evening pasture improvement tour at his farm beginning at 6 p.m. Dr. J.D. Green, UK Extension weed specialist, will identify various pasture weeds and discuss the best method to control them. This will be a hands-on exercise, so plan to do some walking.

  • Focus on finance: Changing life insurance?

    Question: As I get older and closer to retirement, my financial needs and priorities in life are changing. I wonder if I should look at changing my life insurance policy. Would that be hard to do?

  • Hotel switching brands after $325,000 renovations

    Quality Inn & Suites is now open in Elizabethtown.

  • Today's job fair includes KyJobs.net demonstration

    Hardin County Chamber of Commerce and the Elizabethtown Career Center conduct today’s Regional Job and Career Fair, presented by KyJobs.net, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pritchard Community Center in Elizabethtown.

  • Planting corn or soybeans in sod

    As grain markets have soared to more profitable levels over the last few years, I have seen and heard of countless hay and pasture fields that will be planted with corn or soybeans this spring.

    In spite of record high cattle prices, the balance sheet simply continues to favor grain crops over cattle, assuming cattle are being pastured on land suitable for row cropping.

    If you plan to be one of these modern day “sodbusters,” here are a few things to consider as you drop the planter into that long established hay field or pasture this spring

  • AGC recognized for safety

    An Elizabethtown manufacturer has been honored for its dedication to safety.

    AGC Automotive Americas was recognized Friday by Kentucky’s secretary of labor for going more than a year and a half, about 1.5 million work hours without any of the more than 600 employees at the plant suffering an injury that would cause missed work.

    That distinction was made possible because of the commitment of management and employees to make sure the work environment is as safe as possible, plant manager Scott Guenther said.