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Business

  • Helen’s Flowers named Store Front of the Month by RSBA

    Radcliff Small Business Alliance has launched RSBA Store Front of the Month, a new program intended to motivate members to maintain clean, attractive entrances to their business.

    Helen’s Flowers at 1309 N. Wilson Road is the first to be honored under the program. Marc and Melinda Roberts own the business.

  • The goose and the golden eggs

    Question: I remember the fable about a goose that lays golden eggs. Is there a goose that lays golden eggs?

    Answer: Yes, there is and the goose is right in front of our eyes and most cannot see it.

    I remember the fairy tale from my youth about the goose that laid golden eggs. The young man Jack climbed the beanstalk and found a giant who had a goose that laid golden eggs. He stole the goose and brought it back to his village. The villagers killed the goose to get any eggs inside and that was the end of the golden eggs.

  • Gold Vault Inn marks 30 years in business

    Marking 30 years of service, Gold Vault Inn in Radcliff also is updating and renovating rooms and considering ideas for improving the business’ curb appeal.

    Danny Sallee, who began work as the hotel’s manager in June, said it’s upgrading bedding in all of its room and renovations will include the addition of flat-screen televisions plus some rooms with hardwood floors.

    The facility features a conference center, business facilities, fitness room, breakfast bar and an indoor pool and hot tub in the atrium.

  • Setting priorities for harvest

    As harvest has begun for most producers in the county, we all have quickly realized patience will be needed as we progress through the fall.

  • Tears shed as Basham Lumber marks 50 years in business

    As two mayors shared memories of Basham Lumber Co. at its 50th anniversary celebration, tears disrupted their stories.

    Basham Lumber and its companion business, Red Hill Cutlery, were recognized during a ceremony conducted Friday by the Radcliff Small Business Alliance. In addition to the company’s service to builders, contractors and homeowners, it was praised for its service as a community partner.

  • Hunt named HoneyBaked Ham employee of the year

    On Sept. 5, Becky Hunt was named HoneyBaked Ham Employee of the Year. 

  • Focus on Finance: What are donor advised funds?

    Question: What is a donor advised fund?

    Answer: One of the most popular charitable giving tools with donors is a donor advised fund. A donor advised fund offers donors the opportunity to remain actively involved with their gift while creating an easy-to-establish, low cost, flexible vehicle for charitable giving. Central Kentucky Community Foundation administers donor advised funds, which were created to manage charitable giving on behalf of a business, group, family, or individual.

  • O’Charley’s completes a facelift

    While closed for five days last week, O’Charley’s in Elizabethtown received a facelift that reflects the new corporate logo and decorative improvements throughout.

    The restaurant and bar in front of Wal-Mart on North Dixie Avenue has a fresh appearance and is rededicating itself to Southern hospitality, General Manager Kelly Taylor-Fuqua said.

    The renovations include a new bar counter, window treatments, carpeting, decorations and upholstery on the booths as well as signage inside and out.

  • Turned down for life insurance? Here’s what to do

    Question:I was recently turned down for life insurance and I am at a loss as to why, how do I get answers?

    Answer:You’re in good health and see your doctor regularly. So what can you do if your life insurance application is turned down based on the results of the medical exam? Realize first that life insurance companies are in the risk-assessment business — not the diagnosis business.

  • Town & Country owner remembers 60 years in business

    After about 60 years in business, Town & Country in Elizabethtown is closing.

    Owner Jane Clauson remembers when her sister, Estelle Clark, bought the space on Public Square in the early 1950s, when the owner of a dress shop there decided to sell it.

    Clark was operating a children’s clothing store for a few years and took the opportunity to run an adult clothing store out of what was, at the time, a quarter of the space the store now has with a small area in the back for an office.