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Education

  • 'We have to prepare for the worst'

    Multiple shots rang out and smoke filled hallways of Elizabethtown Community and Technical College on Wednesday as students and faculty quickly scattered to the nearest open classroom to take cover.

    As part of a Safe School Program sponsored by the Kentucky State Police, faculty and students spent a day of their spring break preparing for the unthinkable: an active shooter on campus.

  • Photo: Seeing yellow
  • University launches next phase of fund drive with visit to E'town

    A capital campaign that already has raised more than $30 million for Campbellsville University opens its public phase this week during a gathering in Elizabethtown.

    The Campaign for the Commonwealth kicks off with an event for Hardin and LaRue county CU alumni and friends at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Stone Hearth on North Mulberry Street. It is the first of 10 such events scheduled from Lexington and Florence to Owensboro and Paducah.

  • ECTC hosts SkillsUSA competition

    Students from around the area gathered Friday at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College to prove their expertise in a variety of technical fields.

    ECTC hosted the regional SkillsUSA competition at which ECTC and area high school students competed in fields such as carpentry, firefighting and cake decorating. Almost 200 students participated.

    ECTC has hosted the competition for years, and generally has success every year, said Arthur Hendricks, event coordinator.

  • Four Fort Knox schools to close

    Fort Knox Community Schools is losing four schools on post, the Department of Defense Education Activity announced Tuesday afternoon.

    Kingsolver, Mudge and Pierce elementary schools and Walker Intermediate School are closing at the end of this school year, according to a news release from the department. The schools are closing because of a decrease in student enrollment related to the inactivation of the 3rd Combat Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. The schools are expected to lose about 700 students.

  • Students invited to take part in Transfer Madness

    March commonly is known for its “madness” in Kentucky, but state officials are focusing on something that’s not related to basketball.

  • HCS re-bids Burkhead project

    Higher-than-expected construction costs caused the Hardin County Schools board to make adjustments to its replacement building plan for G.C. Burkhead Elementary School and seek new proposals.

    The board voted Tuesday to re-bid construction of the project after reviewing the first bid submissions. The board also voted to revise the project’s construction documents by trimming multiple items.

  • JHHS to host prom fashion show

    Students still searching for that perfect prom dress can find ideas at this weekend’s prom fashion show. John Hardin High School students will host a prom fashion show and dinner Saturday at the high school.

    The dinner begins at 6 p.m., followed by the fashion show, featuring formal wear for men and women, at 7 p.m. Geno’s Formal Affair and Bridal Warehouse supply gowns and tuxedos to be modeled by John Hardin students, and multiple salons provide hair and make-up services for the students.

  • HMH, county schools announce partnership for career programs

    Hardin County Schools is continuing to bolster its list of community partners interested in providing workplace experience to students.

    HCS and Hardin Memorial Health officials announced a partnership Monday that will allow students in the Early College and Career Center to work clinical hours and participate in internships at the hospital during their senior year.

    The partnership will allow HCS students to work in their chosen fields before graduating. HMH officials hope it will encourage students to return to the hospital to begin their careers.

  • Teacher develops Preschool Scientist of the Week

    Preschool students at Heartland Elementary School and their families are learning science lessons at home.

    Monica Bybee, a preschool teacher at Heartland, started an initiative called Preschool Scientist of the Week, in which students and their families perform an experiment at home and report the results during class.

    Bybee wanted to give students more opportunities to perform science experiments, especially because these are their earliest experiences in education.