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Education

  • Four Hardin County students complete Governor's School for the Arts

    For the last 27 years, high school dancers, artist, musicians and talented students from all over Kentucky gather for three weeks in the summer to learn and practice various art forms as a part of The Kentucky Center’s Governor’s School for the Arts.

  • North Middle band headed to national concert festival in 2015

    Next year is a big one for band programs in Radcliff.

    North Middle School band is the second middle school group in Kentucky to be invited to the Music for All Bands of America National Concert Band Festival.

  • Presentation hall in EC3 named for superintendent

    The Hardin County Schools’ board had only one item under new business during its monthly meeting Tuesday night.

    The board voted to name the presentation hall in the Early College and Career Center after Superintendent Nannette Johnston, who has been a major influence throughout the project. 

  • CHHS Robotics team wins national championship

    The Central Hardin High School VEX Ro­botics teams have proved once again that hard work and dedication pays off.

    The teams ended their already successful year with a 2013-2014 National Championship at the Technol­ogy Student Association National Con­fer­ence in Washington, D.C.

  • ECTC students win at national SkillsUSA competition

    Local Elizabethtown Community and Technical College students participated and won in the 50th annual SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference June 23-27 in Kan­sas City, Missouri. Several came home with awards.

  • McKendree University celebrates four decades of degree-giving in Kentucky

    The 2014-15 academic year marks a milestone for McKendree University’s Ken­tucky campuses.

    The university celebrated its 40th anniversary serving in Kentucky on Tuesday with food, tours and a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Both its Radcliff and Louisville locations are celebrating the anniversary this year.

    “Our programs have expanded over the years,” said Christian Blome, executive director of Kentucky campuses. “They have changed and evolved. We’re also experiencing enrollment growth on both of our campuses.”

  • Local schools launching bornlearning Academies

    Two local schools have been awarded money to launch early childhood learning programs called bornlearning Academies for the upcoming school year.

    North Park Elementary School and Panther Academy were among schools recognized Monday at the opening of the Ready Kids Conference at the Galt House in Louisville. More than 1,000 early childhood professionals from throughout Kentucky are attending the professional development conference this week, including representatives from both local schools.

  • Central Hardin sophomore designs inaugural EC3 logo

    Sophomore Brandy Becker is getting an early start on her art career.

    During Central Hardin High School’s second trimester, Brandy created as a class assignment a logo design for the Early College and Career Center.

    Dan Robbins, incoming EC3 principal, along with various Hardin County Schools board members, invited all three HCS high schools to participate in creating the logo, because they all are going to be a part of the center. The center is set to open this fall.

  • North Hardin marching band selected for Macy's Parade 2015

    North Hardin High School band members were thrilled Wednesday afternoon when representatives from Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade invited them to participate in the iconic event in downtown New York City in 2015.

    “It’s about to be a great afternoon,” said Wesley Whatley, creative director of Macy’s Parade and Entertainment Group, in front of an anxious crowd in the North Hardin High School gymnasium.

    Band members, parents, public figures and some staff and faculty were present for the announcement, filling the gym.

  • HCS recognizes successful alumni

    In August 1981, Tim Isaacs’ life took a turn as he moved from Louisville to Hardin County. A psychiatrist told his mother Isaacs was self-destructive and needed help she could not provide. He told her if something didn’t change dramatically, Isaacs would be dead before he turned 16.