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Education

  • Cabinet report reveals hits, misses in college success

    A new report shows local schools exceeding the state in high school graduates who enroll in college, but those graduates are falling behind in terms of completing a full course-load during their first year in higher education.

  • JHHS Renaissance Festival will take ye back in time

    Visitors to Saturday’s Renaissance Festival at John Hardin High School will be taken back to a time that most can only dream about.

    The festival is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the school’s commons area and features an array of activities, including vendors and choir and drama performances. The event is free.

    It’s the school’s first attempt at the event.

    “We’re hoping this is something that we can continue to do and get more vendors,” said John Hardin English teacher Elizabeth Lanham.

  • WKU recognizes local scholars

    After being treated to lunch, Tiffany DeLoach’s feelings about Western Kentucky University have strengthened.

    “I love it,” the North Hardin High School senior said about the university’s Scholars Luncheon. “They’re already at the top and now they’re just in their own category.”

    DeLoach was one of many high school seniors of local districts recognized for their achievements Tuesday at the Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown. WKU hosts seven luncheons across the state.

  • The band plays on: North off to Grand National Championships

    State competition is behind them and the North Hardin High School band is marching on to national competition.

    The band placed 10th out of 38 bands in the Bands of America super regional this past weekend in Indianapolis. The band next competes at 1:15 p.m. Friday in the Bands of America Grand National Championships at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.

  • Central Hardin teacher receives national award in consumer sciences

    A local teacher has been nationally recognized for her union of community service and consumer sciences education.

    Leslie Lewis, a family and consumer sciences teacher at Central Hardin High School, is this year’s recipient of the National Family and Consumer Sciences Pride Award, which recognizes an educator for their promotion and development of family and consumer sciences education.

  • Districts receive new program review data

    An additional piece of the new education accountability model shows while several local schools have successful arts and career programs, many others need improvement to meet proficiency.

    Reviews of arts and humanities, practical living and career studies and writing programs were released for each school in the state this week. This is a new piece of the Unbridled Learning: College/Career Readiness for All model, and next year’s scores will be included in the overall scores given to each school and district.

  • Program review results

    These are scores from the reviews of the arts and humanities, practical living and career studies and writing programs at local schools. Twelve is the highest-possible score.

  • KSP to start Active Shooter Training Program

    State police are working to minimize potential school violence with a new training program for educators.

    Kentucky State Police started an Active Shooter Training Program aimed at preparing school personnel in the event of a gunman in the building. Schools and districts can contact area posts and KSP headquarters in Frankfort to schedule a training session with law enforcement.

  • No tricks, just treats: Panther Academy, E'town High School continue partnership with Halloween festivities

    Jacob Sullivan works with Izaiah Doctor every week on Izaiah’s reading skills, but on Thursday, the pair focused less on learning vowel sounds and more on collecting candy.

    Kindergarteners from Panther Academy spent part of the morning trick-or-treating through the halls of Elizabethtown High School. This is the second year high school students have hosted their younger counterparts, and the Halloween festivities are part of an on-going relationship between the two schools.

  • Legislator talks textbooks with T.K. Stone students

    Tiring of losing pages when they open their textbooks, T.K. Stone Middle School students requested a local legislator’s help in finding money for replacements.

    State Rep. Jimmie Lee, D-Elizabethtown, visited the school Tuesday to discuss the issue after students wrote letters requesting money be set aside for updating their crumbling copies.

    Lee said education money in general is a topic weighing on the minds of many legislators and their constituents.