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Education

  • Lincoln Trail student recognized in national essay contest

    A local elementary student has been recognized nationally for her writing skills.

    Holly Haas, a fifth-grader at Lincoln Trail Elementary School, was selected as one of 10 winners in a national essay contest for Storyworks magazine, a Scholastic publication used by teachers. Holly and her teacher, Alana Wooldridge, submitted Holly’s essay on a play involving mythical hero Hercules.

    The magazine offers contests in every issue; Wooldridge’s class also had a winner last year.

  • John Hardin hosts first Renaissance Fair

    Lunch tables were moved to accommodate sword-fights and archery Saturday at John Hardin High School. The swash-buckling in period costume was part of the school’s first Renaissance Fair.

    The fair was sponsored by John Hardin staff and students, many of who participate in the choir and drama programs and took part by dressing the part and giving presentations.

  • Local schools give students push toward college life

    College Application Week is all about setting expectations and giving kids the push they need to pursue higher education, John Hardin High School Counselor Kim Case said. And students will rise to that challenge.

    “Kids will meet whatever expectations you set, nine times out of 10,” Case said.

    This week, local schools participated in College Application Week, a statewide program run by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority that  encourages students to seek higher education.

  • Local teachers named Educators of Distinction

    Two local educators were named Claes Nobel Educators of Distinction by the National Society of High School Scholars.

    Angela Cannon, a teacher at North Hardin High School, and Jesse Cantrall, a teacher at Central Hardin High School, were nominated for the awards by students who are members of the national society.

    The award recognizes teachers who serve as role models and those who encourage and motivate their students.

  • Cabinet report reveals hits, misses in college success

    A new report shows local schools exceeding the state in high school graduates who enroll in college, but those graduates are falling behind in terms of completing a full course-load during their first year in higher education.

  • JHHS Renaissance Festival will take ye back in time

    Visitors to Saturday’s Renaissance Festival at John Hardin High School will be taken back to a time that most can only dream about.

    The festival is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the school’s commons area and features an array of activities, including vendors and choir and drama performances. The event is free.

    It’s the school’s first attempt at the event.

    “We’re hoping this is something that we can continue to do and get more vendors,” said John Hardin English teacher Elizabeth Lanham.

  • WKU recognizes local scholars

    After being treated to lunch, Tiffany DeLoach’s feelings about Western Kentucky University have strengthened.

    “I love it,” the North Hardin High School senior said about the university’s Scholars Luncheon. “They’re already at the top and now they’re just in their own category.”

    DeLoach was one of many high school seniors of local districts recognized for their achievements Tuesday at the Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown. WKU hosts seven luncheons across the state.

  • The band plays on: North off to Grand National Championships

    State competition is behind them and the North Hardin High School band is marching on to national competition.

    The band placed 10th out of 38 bands in the Bands of America super regional this past weekend in Indianapolis. The band next competes at 1:15 p.m. Friday in the Bands of America Grand National Championships at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.

  • Central Hardin teacher receives national award in consumer sciences

    A local teacher has been nationally recognized for her union of community service and consumer sciences education.

    Leslie Lewis, a family and consumer sciences teacher at Central Hardin High School, is this year’s recipient of the National Family and Consumer Sciences Pride Award, which recognizes an educator for their promotion and development of family and consumer sciences education.

  • Districts receive new program review data

    An additional piece of the new education accountability model shows while several local schools have successful arts and career programs, many others need improvement to meet proficiency.

    Reviews of arts and humanities, practical living and career studies and writing programs were released for each school in the state this week. This is a new piece of the Unbridled Learning: College/Career Readiness for All model, and next year’s scores will be included in the overall scores given to each school and district.