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Local News

  • E’town police to crack down on distracted driving

    The Elizabethtown Police Department is stepping up its anti-distracted driving efforts.

    As part of the national “U Drive. U Text. U Pay.” campaign, the department is cracking down on all distractions behind the wheel, not just texting, spokesman Virgil Willoughby said.

    “Because of this campaign, word has been sent out to look for distracted drivers,” he said. “We are looking for anything that takes your eyes off the road. We want to remind everyone to pay attention.”

    The campaign lasts until April 15.

  • Voter registration deadline approaching

    The final day to register to vote in the May 20 primary election is April 21.

    Eligible Kentucky voters must be at least 18 years of age, be a U.S. citizen and live within the state for a minimum of 28 days before the election, according to the Secretary of State's Office.

  • Teams' fundraising efforts have gone to the dogs

    In an effort to raise money for Relay for Life, two teams are kick-starting Bark for Life.

    The event allows families and their dogs to come together and walk to honor cancer survivors and the care giving qualities of canine companions.

    The American Cancer Society sponsors Bark for Life nationally and a Relay for Life team from The Cecilian Bank and Team Go Getters decided to join forces to sponsor the event locally.

  • Chasing his dreams: E'town man follows passion back home

    When Hashim Madyun attended film school first in New York City then in Los Angeles, he dreamed of the day when casting directors would line up at his door to hand him scripts.

    Although that day has not yet arrived, the 28-year-old from Elizabethtown is one step closer by landing a part as a Churchill Downs stable guard in the feature film “50 to 1,” the story behind 135th Kentucky Derby winner Mine That Bird.

    “After filming, I was good for the year,” he said. “I didn’t need Christmas or birthday presents after that.”

  • Restoring history: Clerk's office nabs record preservation grant

    When Hashim Madyun attended film school first in New York City then in Los Angeles, he dreamed of the day when casting directors would line up at his door to hand him scripts.

    Although that day has not yet arrived, the 28-year-old from Elizabethtown is one step closer by landing a part as a Churchill Downs stable guard in the feature film “50 to 1,” the story behind 135th Kentucky Derby winner Mine That Bird.

    “After filming, I was good for the year,” he said. “I didn’t need Christmas or birthday presents after that.”

  • Ancestral Trails Historical Society to host 12th annual book fair

    Residents interested in local history or family ancestry can find books to help with research at an upcoming event.

    The Ancestral Trails Historical Society is hosting its 12th annual book fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Pritchard Community Center in Elizabethtown. Admission is free.

     “This year we will have several authors from the area and surrounding area offering books of historical note for sale along with a history jamboree,” said Ancestral Trails webmaster George Williams.

  • PHOTO: Stealing lunch
  • Grieving fathers want action against PTSD

    In an effort to reduce suicide rates in soldiers returning from war, two Glasgow men are drafting legislation to require all soldiers returning from war to be screened for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Jaime Morehead, founder of Protect Our Wounded Soldiers, and Freddie Joe Wilkerson, a retired Kentucky National Guard command sergeant major, are spearheading the grassroots operation to draft a bill to present to Congress.

  • Statue showcases family craftsmanship, traditions

    When Gertrude Mayhew died, Leitchfield residents Brittany and Damon Lasley III inherited a small plaster statue.

    “When Damon got home (from work) he saw it and asked what it was,” Brittany said.

    She laughed when she remembered his reaction. The doll is an Infant of Prague, a Catholic statue that first was a wedding gift for a princess in the 16th century. Copies of the statue have been made for years and can be found around the world.

  • They went off to see the Wizard Comic Con

    The streets of downtown Louisville were filled last weekend with Jedi, superheroes and characters from the long-running British sci-fi series “Doctor Who.”

    The Wizard World Comic Con — “con” is short for “convention” — stopped in Louisville and brought many celebrities from the realms of comics, sci-fi and fantasy. The turnout was so strong it will return next year.

    Some Hardin County residents joined the fun.