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Local News

  • Barbecue supports local causes

    Peyton Blair, 2, bounced on her toes as she watched Elizabethtown Lions Club representatives pile her plate with barbecue chicken, coleslaw and baked beans.

    Her mother, Dawn, of Elizabethtown, smiled down.

    “You like chicken,” Dawn said.

    Dawn and Jeff Blair brought Peyton and their son, Nick, a third-grader at Morningside Elementary School, Saturday to enjoy the club’s annual barbecue chicken fundraiser.

  • Rodeo provides passion, high risks in bull riding

    Eddie Van Huss was 13 years old when he rode his first bull. The animal’s name was Honky Tonk.

    “I had a buddy start doing it,” Van Huss said. “I figured, ‘Well, I’ll try it’ and sort of got hooked on it.”

    Van Huss fondly recalls the surge of excitement at the Southern Extreme Bull Riding Association event in Loretto. His mother, Jennifer Englund, recalls different emotions.

    “I didn’t even watch. Let’s put it that way,” she said.

  • Local artists showcased in State Theater show

    Local art brightened the walls Saturday at the Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown during the facility’s first art show and auction.

    Elizabethtown artist Samuel Dunlap displayed an oil painting he created of a house in a snowy landscape. He also displayed a pastel of a pony lowering its head to a rabbit in grass. That one he created as a budding 6-year-old artist. It hung next to portraits and other works he has turned out as an adult.

    “I love expressing images that other people like to see,” he said.

  • I-65 delays expected

    Delays are possible on southbound Interstate 65 in Hardin County as contract crews begin repairs along concrete sections of the road beginning tonight.

    That work requires closure of two lanes, leaving one available for southbound travel from mile-marker 103 to mile-marker 100.

    Work is scheduled to take place during the next two weeks on Sunday night through Thursday morning.

    Long delays are possible during that time, especially in the middle and late in the day. Drivers are asked to watch for stopped and slow-moving traffic.

  • 'Mr. John Deere' takes final tractor ride

    The man affectionately known to his friends as “Mr. John Deere” was sent off after his funeral Saturday in a manner fitting the way he lived his life.

    Murrel “Hopper” Tharp, 75, was known around his hometown of Hodgenville as a man who would stop whatever he was doing to help someone. He was a lover of tractors and, in particular, John Deere equipment.

  • Burglaries hit Elizabethtown’s north side
  • E'town council to discuss hall of fame lease

    The Kentucky High School Basketball Hall of Fame may be closer to securing a temporary home as it raises money and ramps up for a 2018 launch celebrating 100 years of organized high school basketball.

    An agenda item for today’s Elizabethtown City Council meeting indicates it will consider a motion to lease a vacant, city-owned building to the hall of fame.

  • Meade County resident indicted for robbery, assault

    A Brandenburg man lodged in Hardin County Detention Center was indicted in Hardin Circuit Court for robbery and felony assault.

    Zachary L. Miller, 22, was arrested Wednesday on charges of first-degree robbery and fourth-degree assault, which the grand jury upgraded to second-degree assault.

    An indictment is an allegation, not proof of guilt. Miller is considered innocent until proven guilty.

  • EIS names first class of alumni recognition

    Doctors, engineers, an accountant, a federal judge and other public servants comprise the inaugural class of the Elizabethtown Independent Schools’ Tradition of Excellence Alumni Award. 

    The 10 honorees, who were announced Friday, will be celebrated Sept. 28 during an awards ceremony at Elizabethtown Country Club. A social hour starts at 6 p.m. with the ceremony to follow at approximately 7 p.m. 

  • Unknown Journey: With life at a slower pace, Stillwell reflects on her cancer year

    There are reminders everywhere of the last year in Mary Jane Stillwell’s life: medical bills that come in stacks of mail; the circled Aug. 17 on the calendar; and the scar where her left breast was.

    Stillwell and her family have lived much of the last year in a blur. The married mother of three received the knee-buckling news that she had breast cancer in an afternoon phone call a year ago Saturday.

    Since then, she has lived with fear and hope. Cried and prayed, prayed and cried.