Local News

  • Love by the fast lane
  • E'town man charged after pistol incident

    An Elizabethtown man was arrested Sunday afternoon on a felony count of first-degree wanton endangerment for an incident police say happened Feb. 7 in a parking lot.

    Benjamin R. Benz, 33, was charged after he unlawfully swung a pistol around in a careless manner, police said.

  • St. Baldrick's shows solidarity for children battling cancer

    For Elizabethtown’s Thad Jackson, all it took was a request of a fellow church member to get him to shave his head for a cause.

    The member was a neighbor of Addison Jo Blair, an Elizabethtown 3-year-old girl who lost her fight with cancer in May 2011, and encouraged Jackson to join him in a St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser. Jackson will shave his head to help the organization find a cure for children’s cancer.

  • Tocqueville Society adds new dimension for United Way

    A national society named after a 19th century French aristocrat is gaining a foothold in Hardin County on behalf of United Way of Central Kentucky.

    The local United Way chapter has started a branch of the Alexis de Tocqueville Society to encourage donations. 

    The society was named after Tocqueville, who studied the willingness of Americans to volunteer and give on behalf of a “common good.”

  • Stories from the Heartland: She's just like a kid

    A group of kindergarten students had lined up in the hallway outside New Highland Elementary School’s main office and when they noticed a special visitor, they lit up, too.

    A 9-day-old pygmy goat, belonging to a New Highland family, attracted a chorus of giggles and baby talk, especially when the animal, Ruth, displayed her affection for a child’s sparkly pink and white sneaker.

    “She likes your shoe. Watch her, she’ll eat anything,” a teacher advised the child.

  • Women veterans to be recognized

    March is recognized nationally as Women’s History Month.

    The Kentucky National Association for Black Veterans is taking that cue and will honor women veterans for a second year with an event called Shining the Light on Women Veterans.

    “(It) seems as though the female veterans get left out,” said Gail Lyons, Kentucky NABVets Auxiliary President.

    Last year, the organization held the event in Louisville;  but this year it is at Colvin Community Center in Radcliff.

  • Educational foundation to host 'The Event'

    The Elizabethtown Educational Foundation is asking the community to celebrate Mardi Gras for a good cause.

    The foundation is hosting The Event, an annual fundraiser to help pay for faculty needs in Elizabethtown Independent Schools. The fundraiser is at 7 p.m. March 1 at Pritchard Community Center and features a Mardi Gras theme, foundation board member April Jackson said.

  • Special Olympics bring competition, camaraderie

    Kuyle Bowman doesn’t talk a lot, his mother Kathy Harvey said, but she knows he’s been enjoying his time playing on the Hardin County Lions basketball team.

    “You can tell when he’s smiling, he likes something,” Harvey said.

    The Lions were one of three Hardin County teams to compete Saturday in a Special Olympics Region 3 basketball tournament.

    Bowman, 27, has played basketball since January, and it’s helped him socialize, which is difficult for him, Harvey said.

  • HMH looks back 60 years to its beginning

    Hardin Memorial Hospital is celebrating 60 years of existence this year, recognizing its growth and successes and looking back on the memories and steps that brought the facility to its current status as a regional hub for healthcare.

    As the years have passed, technology has advanced mightily, the main campus on North Dixie Avenue has expanded and the hospital’s footprint has grown from one to 10 counties.

    Staff and executives at HMH this week took some time for reflection, relaying some of their fondest memories.

  • HMH celebrates 60 years of change

    Barbara Proffitt has witnessed significant changes at Hardin Memorial Hospital, both as an employee and as a resident of Hardin County. Nothing made that more evident than the bill she received when her daughter was born at the hospital, a bill that now is framed for display at the 60th anniversary celebration at the hospital Friday.

    Total charges, written by hand, for bringing Rhonda Proffitt Hunter into the world in March 1959 were $168.85. The financial burden on Proffitt, however, was significantly less.

    “We got out for $19.50,” Proffitt said.