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Local News

  • Johnstown Road closing next week for E2RC work

    Johnstown Road in Elizabethtown will close for a week to 10 days starting Monday as crews continue work on the Elizabethtown to Radcliff Connector.

    During the closure, motorists are encouraged to use Ring Road to access Amanda Jo Drive to Ruby Drive, which feeds into Woodland Drive to the Elizabethtown Bypass and West Dixie Avenue, as an alternate route, said Elizabethtown City Engineer Scott Reynolds.

  • Historic State Theater hosts such goings on for The Mayberry Man

    Emily West’s fascination with Andy Griffith was cultivated as a child, joining her mother every day after school to enjoy “”The Andy Griffith Show” during dinner.

    “It was our routine,” she said.

    While West is too young to recall the show’s first run on television, she fell in love with characters who inhabited the fictional sleepy town of Mayberry through reruns, she said.

    When Griffith died earlier this month at age 86, the Historic State Theater’s executive director felt a part of her world die too.

  • Reward goes to Trooper Island
  • County government to funnel quarter million into reserves

    Hardin County government is adding more money to its reserves.

    Judge-Executive Harry Berry said the county completed the 2011-12 fiscal year with a $662,227 surplus, a portion of which will be poured into reserves.

    Berry will present a full report on the county’s fiscal performance to Hardin Fiscal Court today during its regular meeting. Berry said it is the eighth year in a row the county has stayed near the “zero line” to close out a fiscal year, seven of which revenues surpassed expenses.

  • KSP post welcomes first female trooper

    Shannan White always wanted to be a trooper.

    That was her ultimate goal even when she worked for six years in the Hopkinsville Police Department.

    She said the perception in Kentucky’s law enforcement community is that the image and professionalism of the Kentucky State Police is second to none.

    “That’s were you get to work with the best of the best,” she said.

    White’s recent addition to KSP Post 4 in Elizabethtown has made local history.

    She is the post’s first female trooper.

  • License plate shows support for veterans

    Kentuckians have a new way to show their support for area veterans.

    The state has begun issuing license plates that read “I Support Veterans.” The plates won’t be available in some locations until fall.

    The plates also are available to civilians who aren’t veterans.

  • Photo: Master of all it surveys
  • Crash survivor recounts events after 70 years

    Ralph Reese braced his feet toward the front of the falling airplane.

    Both the left and right engine had failed in the B-34 bomber, and the plane and its few passengers were falling 9,000 feet from the sky in a controlled crash landing.

    Reese, the top flight engineer, prayed before the World War II-era plane stuck trees in the woods at 150 mph.

    The circumstances that led to the crash began with a clandestine meeting that could have been in a spy thriller.

  • Photographer helps military families

     

    An Elizabethtown independent photographer has joined a nationwide effort to help provide memories for military families for free.

    Nakia Earhart, owner of KLM Photography in Elizabethtown, has joined the nonprofit organization Photos for Soldiers, which gets photographers across the country to donate their time to military families.

    They offer free photo shoots to the families of deployed soldiers and send pictures to the soldiers to keep during deployments, Earhart said.

  • Volunteers help organizations on Day of Caring

    Ed Staton, vice president of transmission at LG&E, found himself Saturday spraying weed killer into cracks in Warm Blessings Soup Kitchen’s yard.

    LG&E employees and family members swept grass blown across the sidewalks by a weed eater they used to trim the yard around the organization that offers meals, showers and laundry facilities to local residents in need.

    They also wiped down every surface they could reach in the building’s dining room and kitchen, which smelled of bleach.