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Local News

  • Community clinic unveils Project United makeover

    Eight teams volunteered to make over a room of the clinic on East Memorial Drive in Elizabethtown. According to clinic director Rebecca Allen, the total renovation cost was $28,913.

    “It was a very significant investment and one that was critical to the clinic,” Allen said.

  • E'town transmission shop repairs vehicle for holidays

    An Elizabethtown transmission shop decided to spread holiday cheer by repairing a local woman’s van for free.

    Joe Wright, co-owner of Mr. Transmission at 1302 N. Dixie Ave., said he, co-owner Henry White and their employees, Steve Swift and Jon Poteet, were brainstorming ways to give back to the community for Christmas.

  • Council approves four-way stop on Dolphin Drive intersection

    Elizabethtown is adding a four-way stop to one of its collector streets by the narrowest of margins.

    Responding to a 3-3 tie, Mayor Tim Walker broke a stalemate Monday to authorize the installation of a four-way stop at the intersection of Dolphin Drive and Mary T. Meagher Drive in an attempt to reduce crashes.

  • E’town council sworn in for new term

    Bill Bennett said those who have a strong relationship with God, family and friends can achieve success despite past failures.

    Bennett took the oath of office Monday, becoming the newest member of Elizabethtown City Council. He replaces Larry Ashlock, who grew emotional when saying goodbye to city government.

    Bennett, a perennial council contender, finally broke through in November, defeating challengers Arnold Myers, Bob Hack and Terry Shipp to claim the vacant seat on the council.

  • Police seize 300 grams of cocaine in drug bust

    Hardin County investigators arrested three men for drug trafficking and uncovered 300 grams of powder cocaine they believe originated in Colombia.

    Darren Deckard, 30, of Elizabethtown, Maher M. Najjar, 24, of Elizabethtown and Joshua W. Rogers, 33, of Radcliff each were arrested for complicity to commit first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

  • Photos: Students gather pennies for presents
  • The giving season

    Charitable giving normally spikes during the holiday season, but some local nonprofit organizations have seen a heightened interest in giving above the typical Christmas rush.

    Organizations and financial officials alike said the uncertainties of Washington’s fiscal cliff crisis and the potential for changes in tax rates next year has inspired some individuals to give more before the close of 2012.

  • Clagett hangs up brushes at detention center

    Dr. Robert Clagett describes his life as a series of projects — constantly moving and sharing his hobbies with others.

    For the retired dentist and lifelong artist, one of those projects came to a close last week as he ended his weekly art classes for the women’s substance abuse program at Hardin County Detention Center. On Wednesdays, he shared his passion for painting with women who were trying to dig themselves up from the bottom.

  • Lincoln Trail fifth-grader embodies holiday spirit

    Janelle Mason spends her work days helping others in need and it speaks to her when she sees children doing the same.

    “It says something about their hearts,” Mason said.

    Mason recently learned about the heart of Maggie Haydon.

    A fifth-grader at Lincoln Trail Elementary School, Haydon collected food and money to create food baskets for families for Christmas. Haydon dreamed up the project as a way to earn five service hours needed for her Beta Club membership, but went far beyond the requirement to make the baskets a reality.

  • Church fuels faith in foreign land

    For missionaries, one week in a secluded part of the world can lead to revelations and life-changing experiences.

    Jamie Lane, a local pharmacist, ascribes to this idea after spending a week this fall in Las Mercedes, a remote village in the Central American country of Nicaragua where running water and electricity may as well be science fiction.

    “You can go 70 kilometers from the capital city and be in absolute jungle,” Lane said.