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Local News

  • Council reviews possible valve replacement at Saunders Springs

    In a work session Monday, Radcliff City Council discussed the possibility of replacing a valve in a pond at Saunders Springs Nature Preserve.

    If the valve, which is estimated to be more than 50 years old, needs replacing, the council will have to add it to the agenda for an upcoming meeting because the item was not part of the budget. Mayor J.J. Duvall said the determination on whether the valve will need to be replaced will be made when the weather clears.

  • A return to the past

    Pritchard Community Center was blanketed Saturday with muzzleloaders, antique knives and horns.  

    Laid out across tables from numerous vendors were mementoes of a simpler time in America’s history as the 18th Century Market Fair returned this weekend, bringing collectors, hunters and shooters to revisit a period now hundreds of years removed.

  • Wesley Cardin, longtime owner of Flint Hill General Store, died Saturday

    An era came to an end as Wesley Cardin, the “mayor of Flint Hill,” has left the building, moving on to bigger and better things.

    The man who touched many lives through his years of owning Cardin’s Flint Hill General Store died Saturday from complications of a heart attack he suffered earlier in the week.

  • Ice daggers
  • BackPack Program packing a punch

    Upcoming population shifts at Fort Knox will be felt throughout the community, including in school districts.

    Hardin County Schools faces the potential loss of hundreds of students this calendar year because of the accelerated deactivation of the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division. The HCS board was updated Thursday afternoon on the departure of the 3/1 and its impact on enrollment.

  • Friends, family remember LaRue sixth-grader

    By RON BENNINGFIELD
    Landmark News Service

    Words spoken Jan. 31 at a memorial service for Ashley Long at LaRue County Middle School assured relatives, students and school staff that though gone, she will not be forgotten.

  • 550-plus pupils could leave HCS

    Upcoming population shifts at Fort Knox will be felt throughout the community, including in school districts.

    Hardin County Schools faces the potential loss of hundreds of students this calendar year because of the accelerated deactivation of the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division. The HCS board was updated Thursday afternoon on the departure of the 3/1 and its impact on enrollment.

  • Blood supply shortage plagues U.S.

    The weather is causing problems beyond school closings and salt shortages.

    The American Red Cross is experiencing a shortage in its blood supply nationwide, said Sharon Thompson, director of volunteers and youth at the Elizabethtown branch.

    More than 770 blood drives have been canceled nationwide, causing a 25,000 blood-unit shortage, Thompson said.

  • Gospel Musical warms up a cold night

    The nearly packed house of First Baptist Church in Elizabethtown was riveted, rising from pews and pressing their hands toward the sky.

    “God is good,” said Pamela Harper, coordinator of the annual Gospel Musical celebrating Black History Month. The musical is in its 28th year and is a partnership between First Baptist Church and Elizabethtown Community and Technical College to raise money for college scholarships

  • Radcliff evens series in second chili cook-off

    Radcliff Fire Chief Jamie Henderson proclaimed chili supremacy Saturday at Colvin Community Center before judges sat down and took a bite of his department’s cowboy bean concoction.

    Radcliff and Elizabethtown fire departments squared off in the second Chili Cook-Off hosted by Rolling Thunder. Elizabethtown took the prize last year, but Radcliff pulled the series even Saturday.

    Henderson, hoisting the trophy, continued his lighthearted banter.