.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Attorney takes role with human rights commission

    After more than 10 years of private practice in Elizabethtown – just more than 20 years of practicing law in general – attorney Keith D. Duerr of Louisville has been named managing attorney and general counsel for the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights in Louisville.

  • Jury hears Galenski’s videotaped confession to police in murder case

    Jurors heard a full day of witness testimony Friday in the retrial of Conner J. Galenski, one of three teens accused in the shooting death of Mackenzie Smyser, 18, in November 2010 in Hardin County.

    In addition to testimony, the 14-member jury panel watched Galenski’s police interview, during which he told a Kentucky State Police detective he shot Smyser once in the chin.

  • Second Saturday introduces marketplace

    The News-Enterprise

    Downtown Elizabethtown’s monthly Second Saturday celebration will begin a marketplace gathering featuring local artists and craftsman.

    The Heritage Council plans the event every Second Saturday through October beginning this weekend. It will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. in the Chamber of Commerce parking area off North Dixie Avenue about a half block from the Public Square.

  • Theft and drug cases populate April grand jury indictments

    The Hardin County grand jury returned more than 40 indictments in April, with more than half of those involving either theft- or drug-related offenses.

    The grand jury returned a total of 17 theft-related indictments and 11 involving drugs.

    Of those 11 drug indictments, all of them involved charges relating to either methamphetamine or prescription medicine.

    Among those indicted is Lajuan V. Rose, the 52-year-old Radcliff man accused of stabbing another man in the neck with a pocket knife.

  • Swopes celebrate new buildings, old cars

    The Swope Family of Dealerships celebrated 60 years in Elizabethtown by dedicating a new Nissan dealership, giving away a $10,000 diamond and celebrating more than a century of motor cars.

  • Heartland Festival lands new sponsor

    With a new date and organizers, the Heartland Festival also has acquired a primary sponsor.

    Fort Knox Federal Credit Union officials participated in various roles in past years of the festival and city leaders approached them about becoming a primary sponsor, said Holly Stapleton, marketing manager for the company.

    A lifelong resident of Hardin County, Stapleton said she hopes the festival “stays strong in the community and continues to thrive.”

    Stapleton and credit union officials are pleased to be a part of the revamped festival.

  • Testimony begins in Galenski trial

    The last time Tiffany Sebold spoke to her then-boyfriend, Mackenzie Smyser, was a five-minute conversation via cellphone around 9:30 p.m. on Nov. 2, 2010.

    “I told him to be careful,” Sebold said during her testimony Thursday in the retrial of Conner J. Galenski.

    Sebold was one of five witnesses to take the stand Thursday afternoon in Hardin Circuit Court. Nine women and five men were chosen for the jury in the second trial of Galenski, one of three teens believed to be responsible in the shooting death of 18-year-old Smyser.

  • Waiting for Gomer
  • Craft fair bigger than ever

    The fourth annual Every Woman’s Arts and Crafts Festival is expected to overflow the building where it is taking place Saturday.

    About 45 women are signed up to sell handmade items from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Colvin Community Center on Freedom Way in Radcliff.

    The number of women signed up means some sellers will display their items on the sidewalks outside the building. There might be a need to find a larger venue next year, organizer LaDonna Eastman said.

  • Clinic celebrates 10 years of service

    Harold McMillen and his wife have used the free services at the Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties for years for checkups and other basic medical services to make sure they’re in good health.

    Otherwise, the homemaker and retired exterminator from Cecilia couldn’t afford basic health care, McMillen said.

    “It’s been a big help to us,” he said. “If we figured out the price of what everything would cost, I don’t think we would ever go to the doctor.”