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Local News

  • Candidates squabble over Facebook post

    An animated discussion broke out between the two candidates for Radcliff mayor following a public meeting. It was prompted by concerns about a Facebook post.

    Mike Weaver approached Councilman Jacob Pearman after the Radcliff City Council meeting Tuesday to address a statement on the Radcliff Small Business Alliance’s Facebook page regarding the next meeting of the North Hardin Economic Development Authority, of which Weaver is chairman.

  • Rangers train at Fort Knox to prepare for deployment

    Fort Knox relinquished the U.S. Army Armor School to Fort Benning, Ga., and the available range space created by the vacancy benefited Army Rangers assigned to the Georgia installation.

  • Fire destroys Hodgenville home

    Firefighters fought in vain Wednesday in an attempt to save a fellow firefighter’s home at 220 E. Main St. in Hodgenville.

    LaRue County Fire Chief Jason Stadler said the firefighter who lives in the house was in training Tuesday night at the station when the original call came in.

  • Photo: Celebrating closure
  • First inmate graduates from digital GED program

    Eric Sassaman walked into the Hardin County Detention Center with the feeling that advancement was out of reach because of his background.

    But he will walk out of the jail this weekend with an education.

    Sassaman, 31, of Wolfe County, is the first inmate at the detention center to earn a GED through the jail’s new digital testing system.

    Justin Hall, information technology director at the jail, said the detention center is certified to administer the GED test in a computerized format as the state moves away from paper tests.

  • E'town named "greenest" small city

    The Elizabethtown metropolitan area has embraced the benefits of Energy Star and was rewarded for diligence in conserving energy.

    The Environmental Protection Agency named the area the “greenest” small city in the U.S. with 53 certified Energy Star facilities in 2013.

    The total size of the buildings accounted for nearly 2.4 million square feet and created a cost savings in energy use of $1.95 million, according to the EPA.

  • Sanders' attorney weighs in on suspension

    LaRue County Schools Superintendent Sam Sanders remained silent about his suspension Tuesday in response to a DUI arrest, but his attorney weighed in.

    Doug Hubbard, a Bardstown attorney representing Sanders, said he was not familiar with the sanctions levied against him when contacted and had not yet spoken to his client as of Tuesday morning.

    The LaRue County Board of Education handed down a 30-day suspension without pay against Sanders following a nearly two-hour closed session Monday night.

  • Freeman Lake tennis shelter upgrade wanted

    Bo O’Brien has asked Elizabethtown officials to consider a slight upgrade to the shelter near the tennis courts at Freeman Lake Park with walls.

    O’Brien, chairman of the Elizabethtown Tennis Commission, said the space has been the target of drafty wind conditions, which can wreak havoc on tournaments.

    In essence, O’Brien said, a wall would be placed at either end of the shelter to block wind coming directly through the facility.

  • E’town High grad works on set of “Nashville”

    Growing up in Elizabethtown, Gina Durkan discovered she had an interest in producing video projects through classes and programs at St. James Catholic Regional School and Elizabethtown High School.

    Her interest eventually led her to Western Kentucky University to study broadcast media. Through work after college, she landed a spot on the production staff for ABC’s “Nashville.”

    “It’s such a huge production,” she said. “There’s 200 people who work for the show.”

  • EPD hosts Coffee with a Cop on Friday

    The Elizabethtown Police Department hosts its third Coffee With A Cop from 9 to 11 a.m. Friday at the Towne Mall food court.

    The quarterly program is a way to reach out to the community, EPD spokesman Virgil Willoughby said.

    “I just want to encourage the public to stop by and discuss any issues or concerns they may have,” Willoughby said.