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Local News

  • Habitat answers challenge

    The persistent pounding of nails and hum of voices caromed off the air Saturday morning as board members of Hardin County Habitat for Humanity poured out their own sweat equity.

    As far as the board’s president, Glen MacPherson, is concerned, this is the way it should be. The board has adopted a mentality of giving back through participation and he said the only way you can do so is to actually participate.

    “If they’re not involved, there’s no point in even being on the board,” he said.

  • Trucker killed in I-65 wreck

    A truck driver was killed Saturday evening on northbound Interstate 65 after his semi rear-ended another tractor trailer. The force of the impact nearly ripped the man’s truck in half and peeled open the trailer it hauled.

    Kentucky State Police investigators reconstructed the scene Saturday evening between the 101 and 102 mile markers, halting traffic on I-65 for hours.

  • One killed in I-65 semi truck crash

    Two semi trucks collided about 5 p.m. Saturday on Interstate 65 between the 101 and 102 mile markers, killing one man.

    Kentucky State Police said the victim's vehicle rear-ended a semi-trailer that was driving at a low rate of speed. The truck was heavily damaged and the driver ejected. The trailer in front was able to come to a controlled stop, and none of its occupants were injured.

    Northbound I-65 lanes were closed for a few hours. Police hoped to open a lane Saturday evening.

  • Photo: Elizabethtown High School graduates walk the line
  • New Mexico man killed in motorcycle wreck

    A New Mexico man died after he lost control of his motorcycle in Flaherty and overturned.

    Robert G. Goff, 58, of Ruidoso, N.M., failed to make a curve while traveling eastbound Wednesday on Flaherty Road, Kentucky State Police said. Goff lost control of his 2007 Harley Davidson and crashed in the 4700 block. KSP said it received a call about the crash around 9:30 p.m. from Meade County Dispatch.

  • Serenity in survival

    Teresa Costello returns to the trepidation she felt while standing in front of the mirror, ready to shave her head.

    Her once-luxurious hair was falling out in clumps and she thought the best course was to shear the remaining locks before it all fell out. But how would she look bald?

    Using scissors to cut down to where the electric razor could do the rest, she stared at her reflection. Nothing but a light stubble remained atop her head.

  • Radcliff removes gun ban at city parks

    The News-Enterprise

    Before addressing its budget needs Thursday, Radcliff took care of some old business warranting attention.

    During a special called meeting, officials approved a change to the city’s rules and regulations banning non-firearm weapons in area parks unless authorized by Kentucky statute or other applicable law. The vote was a response to the state’s notice that local municipalities no longer have the authority to legislate firearms controls. Previously, the city banned guns in local parks.

  • Veterans Way earthwork will create delays, slow traffic

    Drivers who frequent Veterans Way in Elizabethtown have been asked to seek an alternate route or practice discretion when traveling down the street in the coming days.

    Elizabethtown will start transporting soil Tuesday on Veterans Way to build an embankment related to the street's extension to Towne Drive, creating a new outlet to Towne Mall which is expected to reduce traffic congestion on North Dixie Avenue.

  • E'town man indicted on kidnapping charge

    An Elizabethtown man accused of holding a woman captive inside her own vehicle faces an upgraded charge of kidnapping.

    Elijah Cothern, 26, was indicted Thursday on charges of kidnapping, theft by unlawful taking-automobile, fourth-degree assault and second-degree persistent felony offense.

    According to Kentucky State Police Post 4, Cothern contacted the woman April 23 requesting a ride home from a location on Shandy Lane in Boston.

  • Transportation Cabinet hosts annual 'Summer Scrub'

    Beginning today, volunteers with the state’s Adopt-A-Highway program will scrub their designated roadsides.

    The first full week of June marks the program’s “Summer Scrub Week,” according to a news release from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

    The state’s Adopt-A-Highway program was established in 1988. Volunteers are assigned a 2-mile section of roadside to keep litter free.

    According to KTC, there are 750 volunteer groups across the state which clean 5,100 miles of roadway.