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Local News

  • Cancer survivors gather for dinner, fashion show

    Several dozen cancer survivors and caregivers gathered at Pritchard Community Center to celebrate another day.

    At the American Cancer Society Relay for Life Cancer Survivor Dinner and Fashion Show, event organizer Holly Cairns walked the room Sunday, accommodating diners and talking with guests.

    During the dinner, 12 other cancer survivors gathered on stage behind a curtain, preparing to model for an Old Navy fashion show.

  • Umpire injured at sports park

    An umpire working a baseball game Sunday at the Elizabethtown Sports Park was injured after he was struck by a ball during a tournament, said sports park Director Seth Breitner.

    Breitner said the baseball struck the umpire in the head during a morning game in the Kentucky Pre-Season Championships tournament, which is hosted by GameDay USA out of Naperville, Ill.

  • PHOTO: N.Y. college students help with E’town Habitat house
  • Public officials scrutinized in Hodgenville

    The Hodgenville City Council voted Monday to conduct a public hearing next month to consider removing the mayor from office. Meanwhile, across town, the LaRue County School Board considered the fate of Superintendent Sam Sanders.

    The council heard an extensive summary of criminal allegations against Mayor Terry Cruse and City Clerk MaDonna Hornback at Monday's meeting.

    The council then decided to call a formal public hearing as a prelude to considering the mayor's removal from office. The hearing is at 7 p.m. May 1 at City Hall.

  • Tomodachi homestay program returning to Elizabethtown

    A cultural homestay program is returning to Elizabethtown this summer for the third time, exposing more than a dozen Japanese students to Kentucky’s history and heritage.

  • Disabled veteran trying to regain active lifestyle

    At one time in his life, Vine Grove resident Winslow Borzotra was an avid cyclist and physical fitness enthusiast.

    Now, with the help of others, he’s hoping he can be again.

    In 2004, while serving with the U.S. Army in Iraq, Borzotra sustained two head traumas from rocket-propelled grenade blasts. Because the blasts damaged his inner ear, he suffers from vertigo and can no longer maintain his balance to ride a traditional bicycle or run, even on a treadmill.

  • Wildfire cause still undetermined

    The wildfire that burned 100 acres or more Sunday in southern Hardin County along New Glendale Road nearly was extinguished Monday, but fire officials still had not determined an exact cause.

    Glendale Fire Chief Richard Peters, who led the command post, said it appears the fire was ignited accidentally, possibly by a discarded cigarette.

    The fire originated along a fence line in the 1200 block of West Rhudes Creek Road between Overall-Phillips Road and New Glendale Road.

  • Scouts take on spring greening

    The armored vehicle standing sentry at American Legion Park in Elizabethtown was bestowed with a gift Saturday morning.

    Roughly 27 Boy Scouts and adults descended on the vehicle and applied a bright green to its muted shell as part of an Eagle Scout project orchestrated by Patrick Quire, 16, of Troop 233.

    Quire said he wanted his project to be visible and to make a noticeable difference to the aesthetic of the park.

    The troop is chartered at Memorial United Methodist Church on North Miles Street, west of the park.

  • Lost Union Army soldier honored with memorial

    The story of an uneducated farmer from Anderson County was buried with him in an unmarked grave in Columbia until one of his descendants unearthed the truth and fought to have him recognized.

    Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-Central in Radcliff honored the sacrifice of Burrell L. Strange Sr. on Friday afternoon, dedicating a headstone in his memory.

  • Tax filing deadline is Tuesday

    With the conclusion of tax season Tuesday, the U.S. Post Office has announced offices in Kentucky will be open regular hours for last-minute tax filers.

    Jerry Morphis, owner of Accutax in Elizabethtown, said most Americans won’t be bothered by the announcement. Because electronic filing has become standard practice, Morphis believes very few people will mail their tax statements, even if they owe money.

    “Electronic filing is always the best way to go,” he said. “It’s safe and you get a confirmation.”