Local News

  • E'town to cast vote on sale of water system

    Elizabethtown’s water system remains in limbo, but City Council hopes to offer more clarity next week.

    The council is expected to vote on the possible lease or sale of the utility to Hardin County Water District No. 2, which plans to convert its entire system to a chloramine treatment solution by January 2015.

  • Radcliff to hold reduced property tax rates

    With factors such as sequestration and a weak economy impacting residents’ lives, Radcliff Mayor J.J. Duvall said he could not justify a property tax increase.

    City Council informally agreed to hold its real property tax rate at 15.9 cents per $100 of assessed value, slightly below the compensating rate of 16 cents per $100 of assessed value, for the third straight year.

  • Garrison commander has personal connection to 9/11

    Twelve years removed from Sept. 11, 2001, Col. Thomas Edwards’ personal connection to the terrorist attack on the Pentagon serves as a reminder of the threat that exists to the United States, he said.

    The lesson, he said, is one of vigilance.

    Edwards, garrison commander at Fort Knox, was at the Pentagon when a plane was flown into the building as part of a coordinated attack against the Department of Defense headquarters and the World Trade Center in New York City.

  • Alzheimer's disease doesn't stop Hodgenville man

    Sarah Hornback said her husband has forgotten more calculus than most people ever learn.

    The grim joke describes how the Hodgenville residents realized Paul Hornback had early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

    Paul suffered a mini stroke in 2007.

    He told doctors as they tried to determine why the mini stroke had occurred he had been having trouble remembering names and other details.

  • Pentagon firefighters share meal with local emergency responders

    Before taking part in a series of local events in remembrance of the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, two retired firefighters who responded to the attack on the Pentagon that day sat down to dinner Monday with the Hardin County Fire Chiefs Association during the organization’s monthly meeting.

    Alan Wallace and Dennis Young arrived Monday morning in Hardin County to participate in several 9/11 events today and Wednesday, including a parade featuring a foam fire truck damaged during the Pentagon attack.

  • Bullitt County man wanted for arson in E'town

    A warrant has been issued for the arrest of a Bullitt County man who is suspected of causing a house fire, according to Elizabethtown Police Department.

    Justin Ray Cothern, 27, is suspected of second degree arson in connection to a fire that damaged a house at 603 E. Dixie Ave. on Sunday evening.

    No one was injured in the fire.

    Cothern is a white male, stands 6-foot-2 inches tall and weighs approximately 200 pounds, according to an EPD news release.

  • Utilities considering benefits of wastewater regionalization

    Hardin County utilities have been asked to consider taking part in development of a regional wastewater commission, which would create a united front in dealing with costs while providing rate control, said Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville and Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District.

    Heitzman led a discussion of the advantages of the commission during a meeting with local utilities at Elizabethtown City Hall, where interest was voiced in studying the concept further.

  • John Hardin band marches on with unique performance

    The show for the upcoming season of John Hardin High School’s marching band truly is unlike any other.

  • Photo: Paddling down the river
  • Methodist churches join in resources, mission

    Local Methodist churches are coming together in an experiment they say will benefit the community and, eventually, the state.

    Radcliff United Methodist Church, Stovall United Methodist Church, Longview United Methodist Church, Muldraugh United Methodist Church, Centre de Avivamiento and High Ground Ministries began this summer organizing a way for clergy and lay people to form a central group to unify lessons and reach out to parishioners and residents in the area.