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Local News

  • E'town mayor to propose $60M budget

    Elizabethtown is predicting a slightly smaller budget this year but has proposed what Mayor Tim Walker calls a competitive wage increase for city employees and a plan to remove its pool at American Legion Park.

    The draft report reveals a $60.1 million budget, which is slightly lower than last year’s budget of $60.7 million. The full plan will be released today at Elizabethtown City Council’s 4:30 p.m. meeting.

  • Local woman helps Okla. tornado victims, volunteers

    As a volunteer with the American Red Cross in Elizabethtown, Laurie Jaggers knows when she is sent to a disaster site, she likely will be greeted by Mother Nature’s wreckage.

    Arriving in Moore, Okla., last month, what Jaggers witnessed almost left her speechless in describing the destructive, chaotic scene after a massive tornado ripped through parts of the town outside of Oklahoma City.

  • Family hot dog stand brings flavor to justice center

    Visitors to the Hardin County Justice Center often are facing hearings about debt, traffic tickets, misdemeanor charges and other issues.

    A family business set up outside the center’s back door might provide a pick-me-up to make it a little better.

    Dave’s Delicious Dawgs traveling hot dog cart often can be found on the square in downtown Elizabethtown.

  • Tips for bridal expos

    Wedding planning season is in full swing and bridal expos are headed to the area. Your Better Business Bureau has tips for future brides and bridesmaids attending a show.

  • Crash victim's identity has not been released

    Authorities believe they have identified a truck driver killed on northbound Interstate 65 between the 101- and 102-mile markers Saturday but withheld his name Sunday as they searched for his family.

    Hardin County Chief Deputy Coroner Kenneth Spangenberger said he is “99 percent” sure of the man’s name and address but was having trouble reaching next of kin and had only spoken to an elderly relative in California. Spangenberger said he would release the name as soon as family was properly notified.

  • Fort Knox 'ahead of the power curve'

    Fort Knox’s energy program has been praised by the Pentagon, saved millions when duplicated in Afghanistan and won enough awards to fill several trophy cases.

    But leaders of the program say some of the most ambitious steps taken by the post to conserve power still are to come.

    The post has developed a geothermal pond adjacent to the mammoth Human Resources Command complex that heats and cools portions of the building while the U.S. Army’s largest solar array will be finished in July, offering another energy option.

  • Ready to fiddle around

    After catching fire with a downtown festival dedicated to barbecue, bikes and blues, Elizabethtown hopes to maintain momentum with the acquisition of a well-established state musical competition.

    The city has released the schedule for the 38th annual Official Kentucky State Championships Old-Time Fiddler’s Contest, scheduled for June 7-8 at Freeman Lake Park. Tickets are $7 Friday, $10 Saturday and $15 for a two-day pass. Admission is free for children 10 and younger.

    The competition pits

  • Some churches say they are sticking with Boy Scouts

    A decision made last month by the Boy Scouts of America to repeal a ban on the admittance of gay youth has led some churches and faith-based groups to denounce the vote and pull their sponsorships of Scout troops across the country.

    But churches who spoke to The News-Enterprise about the new policy said they are sticking with the Scout troops they chartered because they want to minister to those in its ranks.

  • Night Moves around Elizabethtown
  • Habitat answers challenge

    The persistent pounding of nails and hum of voices caromed off the air Saturday morning as board members of Hardin County Habitat for Humanity poured out their own sweat equity.

    As far as the board’s president, Glen MacPherson, is concerned, this is the way it should be. The board has adopted a mentality of giving back through participation and he said the only way you can do so is to actually participate.

    “If they’re not involved, there’s no point in even being on the board,” he said.