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Local News

  • Shooting competition rooted in science fiction

    With a new segment of shooting sports growing fast, Frank Jardim is building an event he expects to be the most innovative marriage of science fiction and weaponry yet.

    Zombie Shoot Series 2012, set for Sept. 8 at a farm in rural Hardin County, is more than target practice. For one thing, the targets are handmade, life-size zombies. And secondly, Jardim has written the story of how the place he calls Live E-town came to be, as well as detailed scenarios for each shooting challenge.

  • Move over vampires, zombies are here

    Zombies, walkers, the undead, whatever you call them, have become wildly popular as has testing the knowledge and skill needed to survive a zombie apocalypse.

    Central Kentucky has not been left out of what seems a nationwide trend.

    Two former U.S. Marines and overseas government contractors and NRA-certified firearms instructors are hosting a day-long zombie survival course Sunday in Meade County.

  • Exchange program encourages cultural understanding

    Miyu Miura spent part of her visit to the United States helping to bag macaroni at Feeding America, Kentucky’s Harvest in Elizabethtown. 

    The service that 17-year-old Miyu, of Miyagi, Japan, and 14 other students from Japan offered to the area fit with her long-term goal of giving back to the world that helped her family and neighbors. 

    Miyu talked animatedly about her visit to the U.S., which is part of the Tomodachi Summer 2012 Coca-Cola Educational Homestay Program. 

  • Heavy rain drenches area

    The dry summer took a dramatic and chaotic twist Sunday in Hardin County with a quick thunderous outburst dumping nearly 4 inches of rain, leaving yards flooded, streets dangerous and at least one store front flooded.

    Only 3.82 inches of rain fell in Hardin County in June and July, but that total was surpassed when dark clouds covered the sky early Sunday evening and pelted the area with a driving rain.

  • Catching a dream: E’town native follows big city hopes, lands NBC job

    As a kid, D.C. Storm never traveled to New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago or Phoenix.

    He never had been to Montreal, London, Paris or Athens.

    Storm hardly even left his home state.

    But now, at age 30, the Elizabethtown native has lived in these places, and more.

    “No matter where you’re from, it’s all about how hard you work,” Storm said. “If you work hard, nobody can keep up with you.”

  • Lions Club barbecue around the corner

    Barbecue fans can rest assured their sticky fingers and full stomachs will benefit the greater community Saturday.

    The E’town Lions Club chapter is hosting its 70th annual barbecue chicken meal from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 11 at Elizabethtown High School to raise money for local charities.

    One of the organization’s oldest and most well-known projects, the meal earnings go toward eyesight conservation, said Travis Langdon, barbecue chairman.

  • Hardin, neighboring counties under flash flood warning

    With more than 3.5 inches of rain in less than 90 minutes Sunday evening, Hardin County has been placed under a flash flood warning by the National Weather Service. The alert lasts until 10:20 p.m. EDT and similar alerts cover several neighboring counties.

    Residents in low-lying areas, particular those along creeks and rivers, are advised to be on the alert for fast-rising water. Motorists are reminded not to drive through standing water in roads.

  • Road work ahead: 31W resurfacing set for next week

    Kentucky Transportation Cabinet contract crews are scheduled to begin resurfacing work along U.S. 31W north of the Elizabethtown square next week. The project consists of resurfacing from the north side of the square to Ky. 1600. The contract was awarded May 2 to Scotty’s Contracting and Stone, LLC of Bowling Green for $275,000.

  • No early votes on alcohol

    A second vote on expanded alcohol sales won’t take place until after the Nov. 6 general election.

    Neither of the two groups collecting signatures to bring the issue to a vote submitted petitions Thursday, the deadline if the vote was to take place before the general election.

    Both groups have six months from the time they began collecting signatures, giving them until October to finish. Any vote compelled by the petitions would occur after the general election.

  • Taste of the Heartland biggest one yet

    Dr. William Handley has been able to continue his love of medicine after retirement in a way that benefits the community beyond serving average medical needs.

    Co-medical director and co-founder of the Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties, Handley lends a practiced hand to the low income and uninsured who otherwise would have no means of medical care.

    “It’s just a big hole in our health care system and things like this can help fill it,” Handley said.