.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Crews begin work on Vine Grove water system overhaul

    A massive overhaul of Vine Grove’s water infrastructure has begun.

    Crews with Horsley Construction Inc. began work in late March and are installing more than 150 valves, 50 fire hydrants and 33,000 feet of 6-inch pipe throughout the city. More than 350 households will benefit from the improvements with increased water flow and pressure, Mayor Blake Proffitt said.

    “This should put the water system in the best place it’s been in decades,” Proffitt said.

  • Drug arrest leads to more charges for Rineyville man

    An investigation by the Greater Hardin County Narcotics Task Force on a Rineyville man led to several other charges in addition to a felony count of trafficking in marijuana.

    Thomas E. Sentell, 34, of the 300 block of Defew Avenue, was arrested and charged with trafficking in more than eight ounces but less than five pounds of marijuana when police found him in a van at a gas station with two teenagers.

  • Study names HMH most affordable in state

    Health care costs continue to rise for patients, but one agency has ranked Hardin Memorial Hospital the most affordable option in the state.

    HMH finished atop the rankings in a study developed by Nerdwallet, a consumer research company that provides data analysis for areas such as education, health care, insurance, investments, mortgages, shopping and travel by comparing prices to help consumers find the best options for their money.

  • Building interest in future careers

    Students at Scott Middle School on Fort Knox got to test their analytical skills and apply engineering techniques Thursday to a series of building exercises that later will be tested under natural conditions.

    Their work was watched under the eyes of engineers from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which has partnered with the Department of Defense Education Activity to stimulate interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematic — STEM — disciplines.

  • Election filings: May 20 primary

    The deadline to file for most public offices passed Tuesday afternoon. This updated list of candidate filings reflects information from the Hardin County Clerk and the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office.

    The primary election will be conducted May 20.

  • Calf returned unharmed to owner

    A calf and her owner have been reunited after Elizabethtown police and residents spent part of Saturday searching for the escaped animal in residential neighborhoods. 

    Imari Doyle, a student at Central Hardin High School, said her cow escaped overnight from her home on Springfield Road. The animal is a school project for her FFA club.

    Lilly Mae, a 1-year-old black Angus calf with tag A09, was captured in a residential neighborhood near the U.S. 31W Bypass in Elizabethtown. She was returned unharmed.

  • Photo: Celebrating closure
  • Freeman Lake tennis shelter upgrade wanted

    Bo O’Brien has asked Elizabethtown officials to consider a slight upgrade to the shelter near the tennis courts at Freeman Lake Park with walls.

    O’Brien, chairman of the Elizabethtown Tennis Commission, said the space has been the target of drafty wind conditions, which can wreak havoc on tournaments.

    In essence, O’Brien said, a wall would be placed at either end of the shelter to block wind coming directly through the facility.

  • KSP searching for suspects in armed robbery

    Kentucky State Police are searching for two suspects after an armed robbery in Brandenburg.

    According to a news release, two white men entered the Friendly Food Mart on Broadway Street around 7:50 p.m. April 6 and showed a knife. They took the cash drawer with an undisclosed amount of money, police said.

    Witnesses said the men left in an older-model pickup truck with a black hood and cracked windshield, according to police.

  • Public officials scrutinized in Hodgenville

    The Hodgenville City Council voted Monday to conduct a public hearing next month to consider removing the mayor from office. Meanwhile, across town, the LaRue County School Board considered the fate of Superintendent Sam Sanders.

    The council heard an extensive summary of criminal allegations against Mayor Terry Cruse and City Clerk MaDonna Hornback at Monday's meeting.

    The council then decided to call a formal public hearing as a prelude to considering the mayor's removal from office. The hearing is at 7 p.m. May 1 at City Hall.