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Local News

  • Lawmakers weigh into ‘Obamacare’ suit

    Challenging reform regulations as an inappropriate federal imposition into health care, 27 states have entered a legal battle that will reach the U.S. Supreme Court next month.

    While Kentucky has declined to join the case, a group of 59 state legislators – all Republicans – signed onto a legal brief to be filed Monday with the nation’s highest court. It formally adds their voices to opposition of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  • Hodgenville could be headed to a restaurant tax

    Will Hodgenville residents support a restaurant tax?

    Members of the LaRue County Parks and Recreation Board hope so. The group will present a proposal Monday to Hodgenville City Council asking for a 2 percent tax – or less – to be added to prepared food in establishments within city limits.

    State law permits cities to enact such a tax with proceeds going to the tourist and convention commission.

  • Kenzi Lewis cut from Idol

    Kenzi Lewis, Hodgenville’s American Idol contestant, was cut from the popular TV show Thursday in round one of Hollywood Week.

    Lewis, a 16-year-old junior at LaRue County High School, has received two “golden tickets” to Hollywood after auditioning for the 2011 and 2012 seasons of American Idol. She was briefly seen onstage Thursday before half of the contestants were sent home.

    In last year’s Idol, Lewis made it through the first round of Hollywood Week.

  • Putting up walls
  • Fort Knox newspaper to adopt new name, redesign

    Fort Knox’s weekly newspaper will introduce a redesign next week and adopt a new name officials say better represents the entire post.

    Turret relaunches Feb. 16 as The Gold Standard, highlighting new features and a new website, Fort Knox Public Affairs Officer Ryan Brus said. The newspaper’s renamed website, www.fkgoldstandard.com, goes live the same day.

    The final edition of the Turret was published Thursday.

  • Two more arrested in connection with E'town meth lab

    The mother of two children found inside a meth lab during a police raid last month turned herself in to police Wednesday.

    Sara K. Smith, 33, was arrested Wednesday at the Elizabethtown Police Department, said Detective Rob Green of the Greater Hardin County Narcotics Task Force. She is charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, fourth-degree controlled substance endangerment to a child, first-degree possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia.

  • The Road to War: Rolling out resources

    Families and service members attached to the 3rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command had a one-stop information shop to explore on post last week.

    The 3rd ESC Family Readiness Group held a pre-deployment fair to assist families by providing information about services and support systems on and around post.

  • Radcliff library branch to reopen in March

    The north branch of the Hardin County Public Library could reopen March 12.

    Director Rene Hutcheson and board members said during a meeting Thursday they hope to host a grand reopening celebration the day the branch in Radcliff is ready. The celebration would be scheduled in the afternoon after school is dismissed and would include refreshments from the Radcliff Woman’s Club, balloons, banners and giveaways.

  • Cecilia woman wants to showcase 'Kentucky Born, Kentucky Bred'

    Judy Blair is ready to make bourbon, horse racing and interesting Kentuckians stars of an upcoming reality show.

    Blair, a Cecilia resident, is gathering ideas for a television show under development called “Kentucky Born, Kentucky Bred,” which will focus on interesting residents of the Bluegrass State. The show will air on RFD-TV.

    She came up with the idea while making pictorial books that focused on Kentucky’s history. She has eight books in print and is working on seven more. She wanted to focus on her grandmother’s generation.

  • Driving danger: Police explain preventing overcorrection

    A common narrative emerged in police reports about several serious wrecks in recent weeks. The vehicle dipped off the roadway and the driver lost control of the car after overcorrecting.

    Norman Chaffins, public affairs officer at Kentucky State Police Post 4 in Elizabethtown, said sometimes police can’t answer why this type of wreck occurs.

    “All it takes is six inches for your tire to leave the road,” Chaffins said.